Find or Sell Used Cars, Trucks, and SUVs in USA

Ford Focus S 3dr One Owner on 2040-cars

US $7,200.00
Year:2007 Mileage:31800 Color: Red /
 Black
Location:

Park Rapids, Minnesota, United States

Park Rapids, Minnesota, United States
Transmission:Manual
Vehicle Title:Clear
Engine:2.0L 121Cu. In. l4 GAS DOHC Naturally Aspirated
Fuel Type:Gasoline
For Sale By:Private Seller
VIN: 1FAFP31N37W125427 Year: 2007
Number of Cylinders: 4
Model: Focus
Trim: S Hatchback 3-Door
Options: CD Player
Drive Type: FWD Manual 5 speed
Safety Features: Driver Airbag, Passenger Airbag
Mileage: 31,800
Power Options: Air Conditioning
Exterior Color: Red
Interior Color: Black
Condition: Used: A vehicle is considered used if it has been registered and issued a title. Used vehicles have had at least one previous owner. The condition of the exterior, interior and engine can vary depending on the vehicle's history. See the seller's listing for full details and description of any imperfections. ... 

Very clean and low milage car. Gets great gas milage..

Auto Services in Minnesota

Woody`s Garage ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service
Address: 13327 Hwy 65 Service Road, Saint-Francis
Phone: (763) 757-2025

Tom Kadlec Honda ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service, New Car Dealers, Used Car Dealers
Address: 4444 Highway 52 N, Hammond
Phone: (507) 322-3069

The New 8th St Auto ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service
Address: 108 8th St NE, Byron
Phone: (507) 424-8258

Poquet Auto Sales ★★★★★

Used Car Dealers, Motor Homes, Recreational Vehicles & Campers
Address: 3106 State 371 NW, Hackensack
Phone: (218) 675-6665

New Hope Automotive ★★★★★

Automobile Parts & Supplies, Auto Body Parts
Address: 7140 42nd Ave N, Wayzata
Phone: (763) 535-5599

Muffler Clinic & Brakes ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service, Automobile Parts & Supplies, Brake Repair
Address: 4301 Excelsior Blvd, Saint-Louis-Park
Phone: (952) 920-5242

Auto blog

Fields 'required' to use private aircraft, could make $5.25M as Ford CEO this year

Thu, 03 Jul 2014

Mark Fields' travels on the friendly skies will soon be a relatively personal affair, as the new CEO at Ford will be required to resume air travel via the company's private planes. Fields caught plenty of flak in 2007 for flying on the company's dime to visit his family in Florida. He's since flown commercial.
According to Ford spokesperson Susan Krusel, who spoke to Bloomberg, Fields (pictured above right, with Bill Ford, Jr. at center and Alan Mulally at left) will switch to private travel "for safety and to maximize his availability for company business." In addition to his new travel arrangements, the 53-year-old exec's salary and bonuses have been revealed.
Regulatory filings by Ford revealed that Fields, whose first day in the big chair was July 1, will receive a base salary this year of $1.25 million and he'll be eligible for $3.5 million in bonuses, both of which are lower than Alan Mulally's $2 million salary and $5.88 million in bonuses received last year. That's also lower than General Motors CEO Mary Barra's alleged $1.6-million salary and considerably less than Sergio Marchionne's $3.19-million fixed salary from Fiat. Despite falling short of other CEOs, Fields' new pay still represents a 33-percent increase over his pay as Chief Operating Officer.

These horribly misguided front-drive design studies nearly became the Mustang

Fri, 08 Nov 2013

As we eagerly await the unveiling of the all-new sixth-generation Mustang, Ford has been giving us some great information over the past few months showing what has gone into shaping its venerable pony car. As many changes as the Mustang has gone through in its 50 years, though, it appears the fourth-gen model played a decisive and pivotal role in the car's future.
As is part of Mustang lore, the front-wheel drive Ford Probe was originally developed as a next-generation Mustang in the Eighties before cooler heads prevailed. The Blue Oval has just released a handful of images showing how bad things could have been - including a full-scale clay model of a front-wheel-drive Mustang (shown above). Fortunately, the FWD Mustang plan was scrapped and Ford went to work designing a rear-wheel-drive replacement for the Fox Body Mustang, with three design studies making it far enough to become full-scale models. These include the soft "Bruce Jenner" Mustang, the over-the-top "Rambo" Mustang and the middle-ground "Arnold Schwarzenegger" Mustang, which finally became the basis for the 1994 'Stang.
By early 1991, the design language of the fourth-generation Mustang had been worked out, and the rest, they say, is history. Scroll down for the fascinating press release telling the story of the fourth-gen Mustang, and be sure to check out the gallery of horribly misguided sketches and various design studies that were all on the table in the late 1980s.

Nuclear-powered concept cars from the Atomic Age

Thu, 17 Jul 2014

In the 1950s and early 60s, the dawn of nuclear power was supposed to lead to a limitless consumer culture, a world of flying cars and autonomous kitchens all powered by clean energy. In Europe, it offered the then-limping continent a cheap, inexhaustible supply of power after years of rationing and infrastructure damage brought on by two World Wars.
The development of nuclear-powered submarines and ships during the 1940s and 50s led car designers to begin conceptualizing atomic vehicles. Fueled by a consistent reaction, these cars would theoretically produce no harmful byproducts and rarely need to refuel. Combining these vehicles with the new interstate system presented amazing potential for American mobility.
But the fantasy soon faded. There were just too many problems with the realities of nuclear power. For starters, the powerplant would be too small to attain a reaction unless the car contained weapons-grade atomic materials. Doing so would mean every fender-bender could result in a minor nuclear holocaust. Additionally, many of the designers assumed a lightweight shielding material or even forcefields would eventually be invented (they still haven't) to protect passengers from harmful radiation. Analyses of the atomic car concept at the time determined that a 50-ton lead barrier would be necessary to prevent exposure.