Find or Sell Used Cars, Trucks, and SUVs in USA

1966 Ford Fairlane Unrestored 66 Gt 390 4speed #'s Matching Rust Free on 2040-cars

US $22,100.00
Year:1966 Mileage:82000 Color: Tan /
 Red
Location:

Chesnee, South Carolina, United States

Chesnee, South Carolina, United States

1966 Fairlane GT
#'s Matching S-code 390 4v, 4-speed
Wimbledon White w/ Red Deluxe interior

This is a very original 1966 Fairlane GT. This car is unrestored and original with the exception of one exterior
repaint. This is a high quality, rust free, correct, and numbers matching 1966 Fairlane GT. This car is a blast
to drive, but the best thing about this car is it retains all of its hard to find parts! This car has been
meticulously maintained and cared for, for the last 53 years. The paint finish is beautiful and shines excellent.
The original sheetmetal is strong and is rust free. The original red GT deluxe interior is impeccable and really
sets this car apart. The engine runs strong but is very smooth and easy to drive. The factory 4-speed is also
correct and shifts like new. The factory 3.25 rear gear is perfect to hit the open road and enjoy this car. If
you are in the market for a factory 4-speed 390 GT Fairlane, this car is hard to beat!
6- 1966
A- Assembly Plant Atlanta, GA
40- 2-door Hardtop GT Fairlane
S- 390 cubic inch V8 4-V 335 HP
63D- 2 door Fairlane GT Hardtop
M- Wimbledon White
85- Red Interior
24G- Date July 24 1966
24- Atlanta DSO
4- 3:25 Axle Ratio
5- 4-Speed Manual Transmission

Auto Services in South Carolina

Williams Tire & Auto Service ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service, Automobile Parts & Supplies, Tire Dealers
Address: 3995 Dorchester RD, Summerville
Phone: (843) 554-0700

Sully`s Wholesale ★★★★★

Used Car Dealers
Address: 115 College Park Rd, Goose-Creek
Phone: (843) 818-2228

Steel City Service ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service
Address: 1506 Absco Dr, Longs
Phone: (843) 399-9150

Simmons Auto Collision Inc ★★★★★

Automobile Body Repairing & Painting, Towing
Address: 3901 Highway 25 N, Hodges
Phone: (864) 374-7848

Robert Smith`s Repair Shop ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service, Auto Transmission, Auto Oil & Lube
Address: Smyrna
Phone: (704) 349-8401

Right Choice Automotive ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service, Used Car Dealers
Address: 9462 Highway 78, North-Charleston
Phone: (866) 595-6470

Auto blog

Watch this lead sled go rallying in Finland

Thu, 19 Jun 2014 19:59:00 EST

Custom cars generally fit into neat little boxes in terms of how they are used. For example, you're unlikely to see a modded Corvette going rock crawling; it's just not what it's made for (though we bet it'd look awesome, for a minute). In the same way, chopped, channeled and customized '50s hot rods aren't really meant to go racing. They look great and go fast, but they are generally more cruisers than sports cars.
However, if this video is any indication, the people of Finland don't adhere in these stereotypes, because this rodder is happy to play in the dirt with his lead sled.
According to the video, the driver is a member of the Ford-Freak Club of Finland, and he clearly knows how to have some fun. Possibly inspired by his country's great rally drivers, he gets the tail way out going around this gently curving gravel track. The stunt is somewhat reminiscent of the stock cars races on the sand at Daytona Beach, and this is probably close to what it sounded like too. Scroll down to watch a very cool Finn getting his hot rod a little dirty.

Blue Oval's new Cargo cab-over rig is largest "One Ford" initiative yet

Thu, 24 Jan 2013 17:15:00 EST

The imposing commercial truck above has a feature that might be surprising to most Autoblog readers - a Blue Oval emblem on the front. Here in North America, Ford simply doesn't play in the eighteen-wheeler sandbox, but that doesn't mean that the Dearborn-based automaker is absent in the heavy hauling space in other parts of the globe. In fact, Ford presently fields two completely different big rig ranges under the Cargo moniker - one a product of an Eastern Europe/Turkey joint venture, and another from Brazil. But that's about to start changing with the advent of this new cab-over model seen here.
Unveiled in São Paulo, Brazil, this new generation of Cargo is perhaps the largest physical embodiment of CEO Alan Mulally's "One Ford" global streamlining strategy. Instead of multiple models, company engineers have developed a new single truck that it says will better meet the needs of truckers in all markets. Designed to compete in what's known as the "extra heavy-duty segment" elsewhere in the world, this Cargo was developed jointly by Ford engineering teams in Brazil, Turkey and Europe.
Specifics remain hard to come by (read: unreleased), but Ford is promising an all-new engine enabling hauling capability of up to 56 tons while still returning excellent fuel economy. Ford's global Cargo lineup will henceforth consist of a dozen models, but Ford tells Autoblog has no plans to bring this hot and heavy-duty action to North America.

Nuclear-powered concept cars from the Atomic Age

Thu, 17 Jul 2014 12:31:00 EST

In the 1950s and early 60s, the dawn of nuclear power was supposed to lead to a limitless consumer culture, a world of flying cars and autonomous kitchens all powered by clean energy. In Europe, it offered the then-limping continent a cheap, inexhaustible supply of power after years of rationing and infrastructure damage brought on by two World Wars.
The development of nuclear-powered submarines and ships during the 1940s and 50s led car designers to begin conceptualizing atomic vehicles. Fueled by a consistent reaction, these cars would theoretically produce no harmful byproducts and rarely need to refuel. Combining these vehicles with the new interstate system presented amazing potential for American mobility.
But the fantasy soon faded. There were just too many problems with the realities of nuclear power. For starters, the powerplant would be too small to attain a reaction unless the car contained weapons-grade atomic materials. Doing so would mean every fender-bender could result in a minor nuclear holocaust. Additionally, many of the designers assumed a lightweight shielding material or even forcefields would eventually be invented (they still haven't) to protect passengers from harmful radiation. Analyses of the atomic car concept at the time determined that a 50-ton lead barrier would be necessary to prevent exposure.