Find or Sell Used Cars, Trucks, and SUVs in USA

2016 Toyota Sienna Limited Braunability Mobility Van | 27k Miles on 2040-cars

US $33,333.00
Year:2016 Mileage:27000 Color: Silver /
 Silver
Location:

Brooklyn, New York, United States

Brooklyn, New York, United States

2016 Toyota Sienna Limited Braunability Mobility Van | 27K Miles $33,333


Fold-out ramp Power Side Ramp
Hand control
EZ-LOCK Drivers seat
Navigation
Blind Spots Monitoring
Dual moonroof
Parking assist
DVD

Rebuilt title


Auto Services in New York

Zuniga Upholstery ★★★★★

Automobile Parts & Supplies, Upholsterers, Automobile Seat Covers, Tops & Upholstery
Address: 31 Crown St, Brightwaters
Phone: (866) 595-6470

Westbury Nissan ★★★★★

New Car Dealers
Address: 15 Kinkel St, Locust-Valley
Phone: (516) 338-5600

Valvoline Instant Oil Change ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service, Auto Oil & Lube, Automotive Tune Up Service
Address: 907 Old Country Rd, Old-Westbury
Phone: (516) 334-1442

Valvoline Instant Oil Change ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service, Auto Oil & Lube, Automotive Tune Up Service
Address: 7374 Pittsford Palmyra Rd, Port-Gibson
Phone: (585) 223-1840

Value Auto Sales Inc ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service
Address: 4854 Broadway, Wales-Center
Phone: (866) 595-6470

TM & T Tire ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service, Automobile Body Repairing & Painting, Tire Dealers
Address: North-Salem
Phone: (718) 729-3500

Auto blog

Toyota expands airbag recall to 2.27M vehicles worldwide

Wed, 11 Jun 2014 10:55:00 EST

Was your Toyota inspected under the company's recall campaign for faulty airbag inflators last year? You might have another trip ahead to have it repaired again. The automotive giant says that it found "the involved serial numbers provided by the supplier were incomplete, and did not include all of the potentially involved inflators," according to its official announcement. That means more replacements are needed.
Toyota's April 2013 inflator recall covered the Corolla, Matrix and Tundra from the 2003 and 2004 model years, the Sequoia from 2002 to 2004 and the Lexus SC 430 from 2002 to 2004. At the time, the company said it would need to inspect about 510,000 vehicles in the US but only expected to replace around 170,000 inflators.
However, the latest announcement increases that figure to about 766,300 vehicles in the US. Toyota spokesperson Cindy Knight told Autoblog that the new amount is the combination of owners who need to have their vehicle looked at again and those who didn't come in for the initial recall. The company learned about the problem when Takata, the supplier, provided it with an improved list of the faulty part's serial numbers. According to The Detroit News, the latest recall affects about 2.27 million vehicles from them worldwide. Knight said owners would receive notification of the problem around the end of the month but repairs would come in phases because the automaker doesn't have all of the necessary parts at the moment.

2013 Toyota Camry Hybrid

Tue, 29 Jan 2013 11:57:00 EST

Giving Vanilla A Good Name
"Vanilla." Taken in modern context, that's not a compliment, but it should be. Vanilla actually has exotic origins, and as spices go, only saffron is more costly. Despite the realities, calling something "vanilla" is not whistling in admiration. The Toyota Camry has been called "vanilla" countless times since its debut, but both the car and the bean have something up their sleeves.
Scoff all you want, but vanilla is the most popular ice cream flavor, and there is no mainstream sedan that outsells the Camry. Apparently, vanilla has an underlying tinge of filthy lucre. We didn't feel rich, exactly, wheeling around in the Camry Hybrid, but we came away impressed, nonetheless.

Ever wonder how to really pronounce Japanese automaker names?

Thu, 25 Sep 2014 20:01:00 EST

People tend to get very set in their ways when it comes to the pronunciation of words. Just look at the endless debates over whether or not to say the final 'e' in Porsche (which you should in terms of correct German enunciation). Or the argument about whether to follow the British convention and give the 'u' in Jaguar a special delivery or to say the 'ua' diphthong as more of a 'w' sound, as usually happens in the US.
This short video doesn't answer either of those automotive questions, but it does allow a native Japanese speaker to demonstrate the accepted pronunciations for several, major automakers from the country. One benefit is that it clears up the occasional debate over whether Nissan should be said with a long or short 'i' sound. Also, listen closely to how the female host says Mazda as Matsuda, the way it's actually said in the language. Even if this doesn't change the way you enunciate these brands, at least now you know the accurate way in Japanese.