Find or Sell Used Cars, Trucks, and SUVs in USA

1979 Porsche 928 Black on 2040-cars

US $12,600.00
Year:1979 Mileage:52783 Color: Burgundy /
 Black
Location:

Hessmer, Louisiana, United States

Hessmer, Louisiana, United States

VERY CLEAN 1979 PORSCHE 928, LOW MILEAGE CAR, WELL KEPT, STAYS IN GARAGE

Auto Services in Louisiana

Uptown Imports Inc ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service
Address: 2923 Tchoupitoulas St, Gretna
Phone: (504) 891-5068

Twin City Tires ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service, Brake Repair, Auto Transmission
Address: 700 Stella ST, Swartz
Phone: (318) 512-4160

Spires Auto Body ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service, Automobile Body Repairing & Painting
Address: 2027 Old Natchitoches Rd, Swartz
Phone: (318) 361-5115

Pumpellys Tire Center ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service, Tire Dealers, Brake Repair
Address: 1500 Ruth St, Vinton
Phone: (337) 527-6355

Parker`s Automotive & Towing Inc ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service, Towing
Address: Frierson
Phone: (318) 741-3191

Mr Fixits ★★★★★

Automobile Parts & Supplies, Brake Repair, Auto Transmission
Address: 213 W Cornerview St, Sorrento
Phone: (225) 647-4417

Auto blog

Watch the incredibly complicated operation of Porsche's new targa roof

Tue, 14 Jan 2014 19:58:00 EST

Despite Porsche having claimed the name, targa tops are nothing new. In addition to the semi-roofless version of the 911, plenty of cars in the past have used removable roof panels - the new Corvette Stingray has one (as have prior generations), and this type of open-air experience has been available on past vehicles like the Pontiac Solstice Coupe and Honda Civic del Sol.
But when Porsche took the top off its brand new 911 Targa here at the Detroit Auto Show, it was indeed cause for pause. Simply put, this is one of the most complicated and intricate electronic roof panel removal techniques we've ever seen, save perhaps, for the setup found on the Japanese-market Civic del Sol from the 1990s.
We won't spoil the video for you, but basically, rather than just the roof panel coming off, the entire rear glass area lifts away the body in order for the small section over the passenger compartment to slide back. This has to be incredibly expensive to repair once it inevitably breaks. And we highly doubt you'll be able to operate this mechanism at any speed.

Porsche announces plan to replace 911 GT3 engines

Wed, 19 Mar 2014 13:30:00 EST

About a month back, we reported that Porsche was suspending delivery of its 911 GT3 due to reported incidents of the engine bursting into flames. A few days later, Porsche told owners of the new track-ready models not to drive their cars and had their local dealers pick up the cars in question. Just a couple of days ago, we reported that Porsche was working on a fix, and now we have the official details.
Following an internal investigation prompted by two such incidents, Porsche has confirmed that is has identified the problem as resulting "from a loosened screw joint on the connecting rod." The loose connecting rod, Porsche found, damaged the crankcase, which in turn resulted in oil leaking and then - in at least two cases - igniting.
Our source is unaware of Porsche being contacted by GT3 owners concerned about the impact of a replacement engine on their car's collectibility or resale value.

Porsche unlocks secrets of its mid-engine 911

Fri, 23 May 2014 15:01:00 EST

Porsche is beginning to realize that it's sitting on a goldmine of automotive history with its secret vault full of rare cars. Autoblog toured it a few months ago, and we were amazed at all of the curiosities hidden inside. Now, it's starting to let more folks in thanks to a new series of YouTube videos. The first covered the 965 prototype that shoved a water-cooled, Audi V8 into one of its cars. Next up, a mid-engine 911 that acted as the powertrain test mule for the Boxster.
The Porsche 911 is inextricably linked to its rear-engine layout. They go together like peanut butter and jelly. However, at the time Porsche was developing the Boxster, the company didn't want to lay all of its cards out of the table during testing. As opposed to using camouflage, it put a whole different car on top. The prototype looked just like any other 911 Targa of the day, but the biggest giveaway that something was amiss was the heavily tinted rear window. By obscuring it, inquisitive journalists couldn't peak at the new engine that replaced the backseat.
It might not look like anything too important on the outside, but this is a major piece of Porsche Boxster history underneath. Scroll down to watch the video about this fascinating prototype.