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1929 Ford Model A Town Sedan on 2040-cars

Year:1929 Mileage:69000
Location:

Chesterfield, Missouri, United States

Chesterfield, Missouri, United States

1929 Ford Model A Town Sedan
Off-frame restoration
69,000 original miles
Color: Ford Maroon
Always garaged
Call (636) 346-2158 with any questions

Auto Services in Missouri

Jim`s Muffler & Brake ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service, Automobile Parts & Supplies, Auto Oil & Lube
Address: 7020 Hwy 61-67, Antonia
Phone: (636) 464-3035

Sargent Auto & Diesel Repair ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service, Brake Repair, Truck Service & Repair
Address: 200 NW Jefferson St, Napoleon
Phone: (816) 463-9907

Affordable Auto Glass ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service, Windshield Repair, Glass-Auto, Plate, Window, Etc
Address: Hardin
Phone: (816) 792-1662

Auto Glass To Go ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service, Automobile Parts & Supplies, Glass-Auto, Plate, Window, Etc
Address: 2097 Exchange Dr, Weldon-Spring
Phone: (636) 946-6249

C And K Auto Repair ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service
Address: 9406 S Broadway, Sulphur-Springs
Phone: (314) 544-3288

R&S Auto Repair ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service
Address: 908 N Church St, Union
Phone: (636) 583-4390

Auto blog

Fitting Retirement: Grand Marquis last Mercury off the line

Wed, 05 Jan 2011 09:00:00 EST

The signs have come down and retail production ended back in October of 2010. Now, the very last Mercury model has rolled off the assembly line. This last Mercury somewhat fittingly takes the form of a Grand Marquis reporting for fleet duty. It was built at the St. Thomas plant in Ontario, Canada, which is the same facility that continues to produce the Ford Crown Victoria and Lincoln Town Car for fleet and livery duty.
St. Thomas' days are numbered, however, as the factory is slated to close on August 31. When it goes, the Panther platform is likely to follow. So long, and thanks for all the fish memories.
[Source: Autoweek]Read | Permalink | Email this | Comments

Mysterious small Ford spied in Germany

Sat, 29 Jun 2013 13:01:00 EST

Our spy photographers have just popped off a few shots of something curious. This little runabout was spotted in Germany out testing with a current-generation Ford Fiesta. We're fairly confident the machine is a Ford, but exactly which Ford model is up for debate. The hatchback could be the next-generation Ka, but we've also heard that the Blue Oval supermini might not get a replacement. Our shooter says the five-door is a bit smaller than the current Fiesta, though there is a chance that this rig is just an engineering mule for drivetrain development. Then again, it could be a model built specifically for the South African market or China, or not a Ford at all.
Whatever it is and wherever it's headed, you can check out in the gallery for a closer look before heading into Comments to weigh in with your best guess.

Is it time for American carmakers to give up on dual-clutch transmissions? [w/poll]

Mon, 22 Jul 2013 19:31:00 EST

Last week, in the midst of Detroit's first days seeking relief in Chapter 9 of the bankruptcy code, Automotive News contributor Larry P. Vellequette penned an editorial suggesting that American car companies raise the white flag on dual clutch transmissions and give up on trying to persuade Americans to buy cars fitted with them. Why? Because, Vellequette says, like CVT transmissions, they "just don't sound right or feel right to American drivers." (Note: In the article, it's not clear if Vellequette is arguing against wet-clutch and dry-clutch DCTs or just dry-clutch DCTs, which is what Ford and Chrysler use.) The article goes on to state that Ford and Chrysler have experimented with DCTs and that both consumers and the automotive press haven't exactly given them glowing reviews, despite their quicker shifts and increased fuel efficiency potential compared to torque-converter automatic transmissions.
Autoblog staffers who weighed in on the relevance of DCTs in American cars generally disagreed with the blanket nature of Vellequette's statement that they don't sound or feel right, but admit that their lack of refinement compared to traditional automatics can be an issue for consumers. That's particularly true in workaday cars like the Ford Focus and Dodge Dart, both of which have come in for criticism in reviews and owner surveys. From where we sit, the higher-performance orientation of such transmissions doesn't always meld as well with the marching orders of everyday commuters (particularly if drivers haven't been educated as to the transmission's benefits and tradeoffs), and in models not fitted with paddle shifters, it's particularly hard for drivers to use a DCT to its best advantage.
Finally, we also note that DCT tuning is very much an evolving science. For instance, Autoblog editors who objected to dual-clutch tuning in the Dart have more recently found the technology agreeable in the Fiat 500L. Practice makes perfect - or at least more acceptable.