Find or Sell Used Cars, Trucks, and SUVs in USA

1969 Chevrolet Camaro Z28 on 2040-cars

US $25,130.00
Year:1969 Mileage:0 Color: Silver /
 Black
Location:

Webster Springs, West Virginia, United States

Webster Springs, West Virginia, United States

It is a superb detailed restoration with even the Reverse Lockout and that annoying buzzer when you leave the key
in the ignition intact.

Auto Services in West Virginia

Total Care Auto Repair ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service, Automobile Parts & Supplies, Auto Transmission
Address: 650 W Pike St, Hepzibah
Phone: (304) 623-2277

Pifer`s Service Center, LLC ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service, Towing, Gas Stations
Address: 115 Elizabeth Pike, Mineral-Wells
Phone: (304) 489-2010

NAPA Auto Parts ★★★★★

Automobile Parts & Supplies, Automobile Accessories, Battery Supplies
Address: 916 S Highland Ave, White-Sulphur-Springs
Phone: (540) 962-1103

Lemon`s Mobile Auto Repair Service ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service
Address: 6003 Kanawha Tpke, Alum-Creek
Phone: (304) 982-3733

Gill`s Automotive ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service
Address: 3791 Teays Valley Rd, Fraziers-Bottom
Phone: (304) 757-0689

Bill`s Towing/Auto Repair ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service, Automobile Parts & Supplies, Automobile Air Conditioning Equipment
Address: 309 Hall St, Warwood
Phone: (740) 635-1650

Auto blog

Indian tuner turns Chevy Optra into Mustang 'Eleanor' replica

Fri, 03 Aug 2012 08:28:00 EST

If you are a big fan of automotive oddities, this may come as a little treat. If you are a Shelby or Mustang diehard, prepare to have your sensibilities violated.
The master fabricators at BigDaddyCustoms are the minds behind what you see above. At first, it appears to be a slightly misshapen custom Mustang, modeled after "Eleanor" from Gone In 60 Seconds, but upon further examination, something appears to be amiss. In fact, the custom shop, based in India, has created an Eleanor replica grafted upon a lowly Chevrolet Optra. While it may take a second for the Optra to ring a bell, you should recognize its badge-engineered sibling, the Daewoo Lacetti, used on Top Gear.
We don't know what star would opt for the Reasonably Priced Car in Shelby's clothing, but it's clearly someone more concerned with the aesthetic than the performance credentials of this automotive mash-up.

Why the Corvette's Performance Data Recorder can be illegal in some states

Fri, 26 Sep 2014 13:28:00 EST

The Performance Data Recorder with Valet Mode available on the 2015 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray seems like a fantastic tool for many owners. Whether they are taking 720p video while lapping the track in their new 'Vette, or just want to protect their purchase from inconsiderate joyriders, the system offers a lot of functionality in one package. However, one of the PDR's features might get buyers in trouble with the law, and it has nothing to do with recording some illicit high-speed driving on a favorite back road. The problem hinges on the various state laws concerning a person's right to privacy.
According to a letter posted by Jalopnik, Chevy dealers are asking 2015 Corvette owners not to use the Valet Mode portion of the PDR because it records audio in the cabin, in addition to performance specs. That's a problem because privacy laws vary from state to state with some requiring just one side's consent to tape sound and others requiring all parties to agree. According Jalopnik, 15 states mandate everyone's permission beforehand, but it's not clear whether these numbers are up to date. (Actually, the report varies, saying 13 states in some places and 15 in a list.)
According to the letter, Chevy is already working on a software update for the near future to rectify the issue. It's possible that simply adding a warning to drivers and the ability to turn off the audio recording function in Valet Mode might solve the problem. Obviously, this doesn't preclude Corvette drivers from using the performance aspect of the PDR, and owners are free tape lap after lap at the track.

800k car names trademarked globally, suddenly alphanumerics seem reasonable

Tue, 01 Oct 2013 11:01:00 EST

What's in a name? This cliched phrase probably gets tossed out at every marketing meeting that happens when a new car gets its nomenclature. We know the answer, though: everything. The name of a car has all the potential to make or break it with fickle customers that are more conscious than ever about what their purchases say about them.
That's giving headaches to marketing folks across the automotive industry. "It's tough. In 1985 there were about 75,000 names trademarked in the automotive space. Today there are 800,000," Chevrolet's head of marketing, Russ Clark, told Automotive News. Infiniti's president, Johan de Nysschen, echoed Clark's sentiment, saying, "The truth of the matter is, across the world, there is hardly a name or a letter that hasn't already been claimed by one car manufacturer or another. You can go through the alphabet - A, B, C and so forth - and you will quickly see that almost all available letters are taken."
What has that left automakers to do? Get creative. In the case of Infiniti, it made the controversial move to bring all of its cars' names into a new scheme, classifying them as Q#0 for cars and QX#0 for SUVs and crossovers. So the Infiniti G, which was available as the G25 and G37, is now the Q50. The FX37 and FX50 are now the QX70.