Find or Sell Used Cars, Trucks, and SUVs in USA

Porsche Boxter Rodster 1999 on 2040-cars

Year:1999 Mileage:77889
Location:

Kemah, Texas, United States

Kemah, Texas, United States

 Beautiful car to look at,fun to drive,handles great and runs good

Auto Services in Texas

Yale Auto ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service
Address: 2510 Yale St, Houston
Phone: (713) 862-3509

World Car Mazda Service ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service, New Car Dealers
Address: 132 N Balcones Rd, Lackland
Phone: (210) 735-8500

Wilson`s Automotive ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service
Address: 5121 E Parkway St, Pinehurst
Phone: (409) 963-1289

Whitakers Auto Body & Paint ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service, Automobile Body Repairing & Painting
Address: 15303 Pheasant Ln, Mc-Neil
Phone: (512) 402-8392

Wetzel`s Automotive ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service, Brake Repair
Address: 24441 Fm 2090 Rd, Patton
Phone: (281) 689-1313

Wetmore Master Lube Exp Inc ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service
Address: 503 Bluff Trl, Live-Oak
Phone: (210) 693-1780

Auto blog

Amelia Island 2013: Porsche 911 swarms the field marking 50 years of rear-engine goodness

Wed, 13 Mar 2013

Perhaps one of the most iconic sports cars in the world, it was no surprise that the Porsche 911 showed up in numbers to the 2013 Amelia Island Concours d'Elegance. Although the original 911 launched 50 years ago, the original and current models are instantly recognizable as 911s, and since the 911 has a storied racing background, there were probably just as many racing versions of the coupe as there were street-legal versions.
As the show's 2013 honoree, one of the prime racing examples was a 1970 Porsche 911 S raced by Sam Posey. There were so many cars in attendance, we didn't know where to look, but a 1985 911 Speedster concept and a Porsche-owned, rally-ready 911 Type 953 were definitely among the more impressive standouts. As an added bonus, Jacksonville-based Brumos Porsche had many of its classic racecars on display including a beautiful 959.

Porsche prioritizes 200,000-unit sales target over exclusivity [w/poll]

Thu, 21 Aug 2014

Would a Porsche still be a Porsche if it weren't as exclusive? That's the question which industry pundits are asking - and customers may soon as well - as the German automaker emerges from the fringe in pursuit of larger volumes.
A dozen years ago Porsche was barely selling over 50,000 units per annum. In a sales surge that has gathered pace as fast as a 911 Turbo, however, it was already hovering around the 100,000-unit mark a few years later. Last year it sold over 160,000, and has targeted 200,000 units by 2018. But it may not even take that long.
Automotive News reports that Porsche has advanced its targets to reach for 200,000 units by the end of this year or the next. The bump in sales would be driven particularly by the introduction of the new Macan, of which it aims to sell 50,000 units annually, starting next year. The Cayenne currently stands far and away as its most successful model. The 911 and Panamera have swapped second place a few times over the past five years, followed by the Boxster and Cayman.

Le Mans-winning Porsche 935 K3 'seized' by DEA agents

Thu, 16 Jan 2014

Porsche has won Le Mans more than any other marque, but only one of those overall race winners was actually based on a 911. That was the 1979 Porsche 935 K3, chassis number 009 00015 that was entered by brothers Don and Bill Whittington. It went on to win at the Nürburgring and Watkins Glen, and scored podium finishes at Sebring and Brands Hatch as well. In short, it's a historically significant and hugely valuable piece of motorsport history. And it was just seized by the DEA. Sorta.
After the Whittington brothers ran afoul of a handful of lawsuits and were implicated in smuggling narcotics, the car changed hands a few times before ending up in the noted collection of one Bruce Meyers. He had it at Laguna Seca earlier this month when a black Suburban, Dodge Charger and transporter truck pulled up with government plates, asked to speak with Meyer, presented him with a court order, loaded the car onto the truck and drove off.
Though familiar with the legal disputes surrounding the ownership of the car and the misdeeds of its famous original owners, Meyer was left understandably distraught over the events that had just unfolded in front of him to separate him from his pride and joy. (Or one of them, anyway; Bruce has got an eminently desirable collection of classic cars.) But here's the kicker: those DEA agents weren't actual DEA agents. Fortunately they weren't thieves, either. The actual story could have been the plot right out of Ocean's 14 if they ever made one and it focused on classic cars. (Is anyone in Hollywood listening?)