Find or Sell Used Cars, Trucks, and SUVs in USA

Mitsubishi Lancer Oz Rally on 2040-cars

US $2,000.00
Year:2005 Mileage:135000 Color: Silver
Location:

Gardena, California, United States

Gardena, California, United States

$ 3,200 2005 Mitsubishi Lancer OZ Rally$3,200 O.B.O. 5 speed manual transmission.

Auto Services in California

Xtreme Auto Sound ★★★★★

Automobile Parts & Supplies, Automobile Accessories, Automobile Radios & Stereo Systems
Address: 10080 Foothill Blvd, Lytle-Creek
Phone: (909) 481-9555

Woodard`s Automotive ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service, Automobile Parts & Supplies, Automobile Inspection Stations & Services
Address: 12831 Alcosta Blvd, San-Ramon
Phone: (925) 830-4701

Window Tinting A Plus ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service, Automobile Parts & Supplies, Window Tinting
Address: 3074 Broadway, Canyon
Phone: (510) 839-9871

Wickoff Racing ★★★★★

Automobile Parts & Supplies, Automobile Performance, Racing & Sports Car Equipment, Automobile Accessories
Address: 2352 E Orangethorpe Ave, Santa-Fe-Springs
Phone: (714) 526-6925

West Coast Auto Sales ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service, New Car Dealers, Used Car Dealers
Address: 2165 Pine St, Weaverville
Phone: (530) 244-8088

Wescott`s Auto Wrecking & Truck Parts ★★★★★

Automobile Parts & Supplies, Used & Rebuilt Auto Parts, Junk Dealers
Address: 1569 Sebastopol Rd, San-Anselmo
Phone: (707) 542-0311

Auto blog

Mitsubishi recalling 2013 Outlander Sport for suspension issue

Mon, 22 Jul 2013

Just 305 units of the 2013 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport are the subject of a recall over a potential suspension issue. Crossovers made from January 17-25 of this year might suffer from a bad weld on the front left strut's stabilizer link. If it fails, damage to the brake hose or tire could result, in turn making steering or braking control of the compact CUV more difficult.
When the recall begins, owners can take their Outlander Sports to Mitsubishi dealers for inspection and replacement of the strut assembly if necessary. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration bulletin below has more information.

2014 Mitsubishi Outlander

Tue, 19 Mar 2013

A Good Start On Halting The Slide
We'd like to say that Mitsubishi has had a tough time of it lately, but "lately" isn't exactly the proper descriptor since the brand's troubles have slowly built over the past decade or so. It cut back on its marketing and it cut model lines while leaving what remained in the equivalent of a product cryo-freeze. Then there was the financial crash and replacement models that didn't possess the same edge we expected from the house of the triple diamond. There was the lack of a North American chairman to fight for market-specific initiatives, and hence, models that lacked some of the details that US customers desired and that could sway buying choices in close races. True, that's a battle with an overseas headquarters that you'll hear from the US reps for almost every foreign automaker, but as you pile on the obstacles they multiply exponentially, not additionally. Or there's this: For more than a year, while its competition has been trumpeting new product, Mitsubishi hasn't had any new models. Like, at all.
That changes with the arrival of the 2014 Mitsubishi Outlander, an SUV that we're told will begin a new-product offensive over the next 18 months that - along with a much larger marketing budget - should begin to turn things around. This is the third generation of Mitsubishi's volume model, one that hasn't really been changed since it arrived in 2006 and wasn't just showing its age, but practically crowing about it.

Ever wonder how to really pronounce Japanese automaker names?

Thu, 25 Sep 2014

People tend to get very set in their ways when it comes to the pronunciation of words. Just look at the endless debates over whether or not to say the final 'e' in Porsche (which you should in terms of correct German enunciation). Or the argument about whether to follow the British convention and give the 'u' in Jaguar a special delivery or to say the 'ua' diphthong as more of a 'w' sound, as usually happens in the US.
This short video doesn't answer either of those automotive questions, but it does allow a native Japanese speaker to demonstrate the accepted pronunciations for several, major automakers from the country. One benefit is that it clears up the occasional debate over whether Nissan should be said with a long or short 'i' sound. Also, listen closely to how the female host says Mazda as Matsuda, the way it's actually said in the language. Even if this doesn't change the way you enunciate these brands, at least now you know the accurate way in Japanese.