Find or Sell Used Cars, Trucks, and SUVs in USA

2003 Ford Windstar Limited Mini Passenger Van 4-door 3.8l on 2040-cars

Year:2003 Mileage:100000
Location:

North Little Rock, Arkansas, United States

North Little Rock, Arkansas, United States

This vehicle has no key to it. You are able to get a title for this vehicle the rear bumper on driver side has a tiny bit of damage that is all the body damage there is.

Auto Services in Arkansas

Warren Service & Repair ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service, Tractor Repair & Service, All-Terrain Vehicles
Address: 1610 W Broadway St, Houston
Phone: (501) 977-0944

Tim Parker Chrysler Dodge Jeep ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service, New Car Dealers, Automobile Body Repairing & Painting
Address: Enola
Phone: (888) 977-7806

S & P Motors ★★★★★

Used Car Dealers
Address: 580 E Dave Ward Dr, Wooster
Phone: (501) 205-1698

Premier Collision ★★★★★

Automobile Body Repairing & Painting
Address: 2913 E Huntsville Rd, Fayetteville
Phone: (479) 527-6680

Paragould Autobody ★★★★★

Automobile Body Repairing & Painting
Address: 600 S 8th Ave, Paragould
Phone: (870) 335-8307

N Motion Inc ★★★★★

Automobile Parts & Supplies, Trailer Hitches, Truck Accessories
Address: 2505 N Thompson St, Springdale
Phone: (479) 872-2550

Auto blog

Weekly Recap: Auto execs face life in prison for recall delays under proposed legislation

Sat, 09 Aug 2014 12:00:00 EST



The stiff punishments are part of broader transportation legislation, but clearly McCaskill has automakers in her sights.
Missouri Senator Claire McCaskill threw down the gauntlet this week, proposing a bill that could send auto executives to prison for life if they were found to have delayed a recall. She also wants to eliminate the limit for fines for auto safety violations, which are currently capped at $35 million.

Ford F-150 RaptorTrax is Ken Block's ultimate snowmobile

Tue, 21 Jan 2014 15:20:00 EST

Even when Ken Block isn't starring in the latest Gymkhana video or tearing up Global RallyCross courses, he's finding new ways to redefine "awesome" as it applies to motorsports. For evidence of this, look no further than Block's latest Monster-badged creation, the Ford F-150 RaptorTrax.
Billed as the "world's fastest snowcat," the RaptorTrax started life as a Ford F-150 SVT Raptor, and then a set of Mattracks were put in place where the truck's bead-locked wheels and meaty rubber once resided. The goal was to create a truck that made it easier - and presumably more fun - for Block and his buddies to hit the slopes on their snowboards. Aside from the obvious track upgrades, this truck also received a Whipple supercharger, full roll cage, Recaro seats, an in-bed snowboard rack, a roof basket and a rear-mounted winch - you know, just in case something or someone actually manages to get this truck stuck.
The RaptorTrax will be on display later this week at the Winter X Games in Apsen, CO, but we'll have to wait until next winter for a full Block-worthy video of the truck. A full press release from Hoonigan Racing Division is posted below, and a high-res image can be found by clicking above.

Ford worker files for UAW dues refund, stirs right-to-work debate

Sun, 24 Aug 2014 08:57:00 EST

Let's start with some history: Ford's Dearborn truck plant, part of the company's massive River Rouge complex, was the center of a strike in 1941 that led to Ford signing the first "closed shop" agreement in the industry. The agreement obliged every worker at the plant to be a dues-paying member of the United Auto Workers. In December 2012, however, Michigan Governor Rick Snyder signed legislation making Michigan a right-to-work state, which outlawed closed shops. The new law gave workers the right to opt out of union membership and stop paying dues even if they were still covered by union activities like collective bargaining. For employees at the Dearborn plant, the right-to-work clauses take effect at the end of their current contract in 2015.
As a tool-and-die maker at Ford's Dearborn plant for 16 years, Todd Lemire pays dues to the UAW - about two hours' salary per month. However, he's been unhappy with the UAW's support of the Democratic party, and not wanting to wait until next year to be out of the UAW entirely he invoked his Beck Rights, which state that a non-member of a union does not have to pay dues to support non-core activities, such as political spending. But Lemire wasn't happy that Ford still subtracted the total amount of dues, with the UAW reimbursing the difference, so he filed suit with the National Labor Relations Board, feeling that the workaround violates his rights.
Lemire's case is just a week old, so it could be a while before a resolution. Yet, as September 15, 2015 draws near and the right-to-work laws take full effect for Michigan workers - and others wonder whether it could help revitalize the state's manufacturing base - a case like this adds more fuel to the discussion.