Find or Sell Used Cars, Trucks, and SUVs in USA

1956 Thunderbird Kit Car on 2040-cars

Year:1956 Mileage:0 Color: Blue /
 White
Location:

Slocomb, Alabama, United States

Slocomb, Alabama, United States
Engine:VOLKSWAGON MOTOR
Vehicle Title:Clear
Fuel Type:Gasoline
For Sale By:Private Seller
Year: 1956
Exterior Color: Blue
Model: Thunderbird
Interior Color: White
Trim: NONE
Warranty: Vehicle does NOT have an existing warranty
Drive Type: VOLKSWAGON FRAME
Mileage: 0
Condition: Used: A vehicle is considered used if it has been registered and issued a title. Used vehicles have had at least one previous owner. The condition of the exterior, interior and engine can vary depending on the vehicle's history. See the seller's listing for full details and description of any imperfections. ... 

HERE IS A COOL 1956 THUNDERBIRD KIT CAR SITTING ON A VOLKSWAGON CHASSIS.  WITH VOLKSWAGON MOTOR, ENGINE RUNS.  CAR NEEDS THE BRAKES FINISHED AND THE WIRING.  HAVE EVERY PIECE OF CAR TO PUT IT TOGETHER BUT TRUNK LID.  HAVE PUT CHEVY SMALL PATTERN WHEELS ON CAR.  NEAT PROJECT!!!!!!   HAS A REMOVEABLE TOP WITH ALL REAL GLASS TO GO WITH IT.    FOR MORE INFO CALL   850-260-9723

Auto Services in Alabama

Nathan`s Paint & Body LLC ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service, Automobile Body Repairing & Painting
Address: 733 Logan Rd, Billingsley
Phone: (205) 755-5599

Mechanic on Wheels ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service
Address: West-Jefferson
Phone: (205) 259-3425

King Auto Glass & Trim ★★★★★

Used Car Dealers, Automobile Parts & Supplies, Glass-Auto, Plate, Window, Etc
Address: 2510 Warrior Rd, Forestdale
Phone: (205) 781-6441

Gardendale Wholesale Transmission & Automotive ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service, Auto Transmission
Address: 532 Decatur Hwy, New-Castle
Phone: (205) 631-9820

Haley Transmissions ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service, Auto Transmission
Address: 2725 Pelham Pkwy, Siluria
Phone: (205) 664-8710

Minor Tire & Wheel Inc. ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service, Tire Dealers, Wheels
Address: Somerville
Phone: (256) 353-4957

Auto blog

Ford family keeps special voting rights

Fri, 10 May 2013 18:30:00 EST

Ford Motor Company has a dual-class stock structure of Class A and Class B shares. The roughly three billion Class A shares are for the general public like you and me, while the roughly 71 million Class B shares are all owned by the Ford family. Each Class A share gets the shareholder one vote, each Class B share is worth 16 votes, the result being that Common Stock holders control about 60 percent of the company while the Ford family controls 40 percent even though it holds far fewer shares. The only way that could ever change would be if the Fords sell their Class B shares, but even so, Class B shares revert to Class A when sold outside the family, so they'd have to sell a whole bunch of them.
A contingent of Class A shareholders think the dual-class system is unfair, and for the past few years a vote's been held during the annual shareholders meeting to end it. It has failed every time, as it just did again during the meeting held this week. A smidge over 33 percent voted to end the dual system, outvoted by the 67 percent who are happy with the way Ford is going - unsurprising in view of a corporate turnaround that will be part of business-class curricula for years to come.
On the sidelines, Ford elected Ellen R. Marram to the post of independent director, the first woman to hold the job. The former Tropicana CEO and 20-year Ford board member replaces retiring board member Irvine Hockaday who helped bring Alan Mulally to the CEO position.

Nuclear-powered concept cars from the Atomic Age

Thu, 17 Jul 2014 12:31:00 EST

In the 1950s and early 60s, the dawn of nuclear power was supposed to lead to a limitless consumer culture, a world of flying cars and autonomous kitchens all powered by clean energy. In Europe, it offered the then-limping continent a cheap, inexhaustible supply of power after years of rationing and infrastructure damage brought on by two World Wars.
The development of nuclear-powered submarines and ships during the 1940s and 50s led car designers to begin conceptualizing atomic vehicles. Fueled by a consistent reaction, these cars would theoretically produce no harmful byproducts and rarely need to refuel. Combining these vehicles with the new interstate system presented amazing potential for American mobility.
But the fantasy soon faded. There were just too many problems with the realities of nuclear power. For starters, the powerplant would be too small to attain a reaction unless the car contained weapons-grade atomic materials. Doing so would mean every fender-bender could result in a minor nuclear holocaust. Additionally, many of the designers assumed a lightweight shielding material or even forcefields would eventually be invented (they still haven't) to protect passengers from harmful radiation. Analyses of the atomic car concept at the time determined that a 50-ton lead barrier would be necessary to prevent exposure.

Ford builds Lightweight Concept with Fusion shell [w/video]

Wed, 04 Jun 2014 10:30:00 EST

It's a fairly well known fact that removing weight from a car is essentially a panacea for many of the modern automobiles problems. Does it handle like crap? Remove weight. Underpowered? Don't add power; trim the fat. Need to improve fuel economy? It's diet time.
Actually executing a major weight reduction program, though, much like with human beings, is no easy task. Unlike you or I, where motivation is the issue, the prohibitive measure in trimming a car's waistline is money. Lightweight materials are expensive, with carbon fiber and carbon-fiber reinforced plastic still primarily in the domain of higher end vehicles. Even aluminum construction, pioneered on a mass-produced level by Audi and Jaguar, is only now starting to make its way into the mainstream, thanks to the upcoming Ford F-150.
With this concept, though, Ford is attempting to show that a mass-produced, lightweight vehicle isn't too far off. This is the Lightweight Concept, and while it may look like a Fusion, it weighs as much as a Fiesta. For reference, the lightest Fusion available to the public is the 3,323-pound, 2.5-liter model with a manual transmission. A manually equipped, 1.6-liter Fiesta, meanwhile, is just 2,537 pounds.