Find or Sell Used Cars, Trucks, and SUVs in USA

1964 Ford Ranchero Pickup. V8 Auto. Ready To Be Enjoyed! on 2040-cars

Year:1964 Mileage:50400 Color: Burgundy /
  Grey/Red
Location:

Ambrose, North Dakota, United States

Ambrose, North Dakota, United States
For Sale By:Private Seller
Engine:8-Cylinder
Body Type:Pickup Truck
Transmission:Automatic
Vehicle Title:Clear
VIN: 4R27F168871 Year: 1964
Make: Ford
BodyStyle: Classic Car - Custom Car
Model: Ranchero
FuelType: Gasoline
Mileage: 50,400
Trim: deluxe packagew
Sub Model: Pickup
Drive Type: 2 wheel
Exterior Color: Burgundy
Number of Cylinders: 8
Interior Color: Grey/Red
Warranty: Vehicle does NOT have an existing warranty
Condition: Used: A vehicle is considered used if it has been registered and issued a title. Used vehicles have had at least one previous owner. The condition of the exterior, interior and engine can vary depending on the vehicle's history. See the seller's listing for full details and description of any imperfections. ... 

RANCHERO IS IN NEAR SHOW CAR CONDITION 260 MOTOR HAS BEEN REPLACED WITH 289 AND HAS APPROX 5000 MILES ON OVERHAUL, CAR HAS BEAUTIFUL METALLIC PAINT JOB, CRAGER RIMS, AIR SHOCKS, DUAL EXHAUSTS CAR HAS LOTS OF SQUAAKUM POWER

Auto Services in North Dakota

Sidney Carburetor & Electric ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service, Auto Oil & Lube, Truck Service & Repair
Address: 303 N Central Ave, Trotters
Phone: (406) 482-3302

Murphy & Sons Towing & Recovery Service ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service, Towing
Address: Zahl
Phone: (701) 580-8066

Braatens Quality Auto ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service, Automobile Parts & Supplies, Auto Body Parts
Address: 210 N Washington St # 3, Grand-Forks
Phone: (701) 795-5164

After Hours Towing & Repair ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service, Towing, Automotive Roadside Service
Address: 405 28th Ave SW, Norma
Phone: (866) 595-6470

Walsh County ★★★★

Auto Repair & Service
Address: Forest-River
Phone: (866) 595-6470

Tony`s Auto Repair ★★★★

Auto Repair & Service, Towing
Address: 411 109th Ave SW, Dunn-Center
Phone: (866) 595-6470

Auto blog

NHTSA upgrades Ford floor mat unintended acceleration probe

Mon, 17 Dec 2012 08:27:00 EST

According to a Bloomberg report, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has upgraded an investigation into complaints of unintended acceleration lodged against Ford vehicles. The investigation began in June of 2010 when just three complaints had been received and it only concerned the Ford Fusion and Mercury Milan, but this was at a time when the phrase "unintended acceleration" made grown men go pale. With 49 additional complaints received since then, the investigation has been reclassified as an engineering analysis - the last phase before a recall - and it has been expanded to include the Lincoln MKZ, making for a total of "around 480,000" units affected between the three sedans from the 2008 to 2010 model years.
The ostensible cause is that floor mats are trapping the accelerator pedal, but according to a Ford statement at the time, the entrapment is due to owners placing the optional all-weather floor mats, or aftermarket floor mats, on top of the car's standard floor mats. NHTSA has backed up that assessment, pinning the blame on "unsecured or double stacked floor mats."
On the face of it, it would appear that NHTSA has upgraded the status not because of Ford's error, but owner error, and Ford has stated publicly that it is "disappointed" in NHTSA's move. On top of NHTSA still being skittish after that other unintended acceleration debacle, it could be seen to be taking its time investigating all of the variables: it's reported that Ford changed its accelerator pedal design in 2010, a "heel blocker" in the floorpan has been considered a potential culprit in how the floor mats could be trapping the pedal, some drivers have said the floor mats weren't anywhere near the pedal, and according to a report in the LA Times, in "a letter sent by Ford to NHTSA in August 2010, the automaker said it found three injuries and one fatality that 'may have resulted from the alleged defect.'"

Ford gives police chiefs tech to surveil officers in their own cars

Tue, 28 Oct 2014 19:00:00 EST

Police officers certainly have a difficult job in keeping the streets safe, but as public employees in positions of authority, there is still a very real need for oversight. To that end, Ford is partnering with a tech company to offer a new system called Ford Telematics for Law Enforcement on its line of Police Interceptor patrol vehicles that could make cops safer, while giving cities a better idea of what its officers are doing.
The system streams live data about cruisers back to the home base to people like the police chief or shift supervisor. That info includes expected things like speed, location and cornering acceleration, but it gets incredibly granular as well, with records of things like if emergency lights are on, or even if an officer is wearing a seatbelt.
Ford Telematics for Law Enforcement "ought to protect officers as much as it protects the public," said Ford spokesperson Chris Terry to Autoblog. Constantly monitoring patrol cars offers cities a lot of advantages, too. First, it reduces potential liability because a department can prove where each vehicle is at all times. Also, officers know they are being watched and may potentially drive more safely.

Ford-sponsored survey says a third of Brits have snapped a 'selfie' while driving [w/videos]

Fri, 08 Aug 2014 09:30:00 EST

Talking on the phone while driving isn't advisable, and texting while driving is downright dangerous. Considering those truths, the fact that we even need to point this out this is incredibly disturbing: taking "selfies" while behind the wheel is exceptionally stupid. But, it's a thing that a third of 18- to 24-year-old British drivers have copped to doing, according to a new study from Ford.
Ford, through its Driving Skills for Life program, surveyed 7,000 smartphone owners from across Europe, all aged between 18 and 24, and found that young British drivers were more likely to snap a selfie while behind the wheel than their counterparts in Germany, France, Romania, Italy, Spain and Belgium.
According to the study, the average selfie takes 14 seconds, which, while traveling at 60 miles per hour, is long enough to travel over the length of nearly four football fields (the Ford study uses soccer fields, but we translated it to football, because, you know, America). That's an extremely dangerous distance to not be focused on the road.