Find or Sell Used Cars, Trucks, and SUVs in USA

1964 Ford Galaxie 500 Xl 390 4 Speed on 2040-cars

Year:1964 Mileage:88000
Location:

Amsterdam, Missouri, United States

Amsterdam, Missouri, United States

Up for sale is a great running, driving, restorable muscle car only around 1,400 of these were made with the Z code package according to Galaxie Club of America. This car is fairly original with its original engine 300hp 390 police interceptor & original interior. The rearend is also the original "posi" but has a 3.89 gear, car originally had a 3.00. Top loader 4 speed is out of a 1967 Fairlane 390 car. I bought it from the second owner who said he changed the gears bolted on slicks, and broke the T-10 that was in it but kept the original Galaxie shifter. Now for the body, its a little rough. Floor pans are good but trunk pan is rusted and so is the back bumper. Also has a little rust in passenger rocker and needs 1/4 panel. This is a Z code car and has a good clean title and definitely worth restoring. Take a look at some restored ones and there prices. Please bid seriously and bid to win. Good luck! I can also help arrange shipping and possibly deliver for extra money.


On Sep-16-13 at 14:22:47 PDT, seller added the following information:

Body Tag: 63CZ8918J5514 63C= (body) 500 xl 2 dr fastback Z= (color)chantily metallic beige 89= (trim) med palamino 18J= (date) Sepember 18 55= (DSO)St. Louis 1= (axle) 3.00 4= (trans) 4 speed

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Auto blog

'Car Wars' says Ford, Honda to pick up share, Fiat-Chrysler ambitions downplayed

Sat, 14 Jun 2014 11:30:00 EST

Don't look for a tremendous shifts in automotive market share over the next three years because it might not be coming. That's at least according to the annual Car Wars report by John Murphy, from Bank of America Merrill Lynch Global Research.
In the report's analysis of automakers' market share from 2013 to 2017, it predicts only small changes among the major companies. Ford and Honda see the biggest positive effect with an estimated 0.5 percent increase in their shares over the next three years; to 16.2 percent and 10.3 percent respectively. On the flip side, European automakers and Nissan are expected to lose 0.2 percent each to fall to 8.3 percent and 7.8 percent each respectively. The rest of the industry is predicted to hold steady as it is now.
The biggest loser in that prediction might be Fiat-Chrysler Automobiles. The report certainly throws a wet blanket on its plan for significant gains in market share. Murphy told The Detroit News that the company's goal was "almost unattainable."

Ford-sponsored survey says a third of Brits have snapped a 'selfie' while driving [w/videos]

Fri, 08 Aug 2014 09:30:00 EST

Talking on the phone while driving isn't advisable, and texting while driving is downright dangerous. Considering those truths, the fact that we even need to point this out this is incredibly disturbing: taking "selfies" while behind the wheel is exceptionally stupid. But, it's a thing that a third of 18- to 24-year-old British drivers have copped to doing, according to a new study from Ford.
Ford, through its Driving Skills for Life program, surveyed 7,000 smartphone owners from across Europe, all aged between 18 and 24, and found that young British drivers were more likely to snap a selfie while behind the wheel than their counterparts in Germany, France, Romania, Italy, Spain and Belgium.
According to the study, the average selfie takes 14 seconds, which, while traveling at 60 miles per hour, is long enough to travel over the length of nearly four football fields (the Ford study uses soccer fields, but we translated it to football, because, you know, America). That's an extremely dangerous distance to not be focused on the road.

Nuclear-powered concept cars from the Atomic Age

Thu, 17 Jul 2014 12:31:00 EST

In the 1950s and early 60s, the dawn of nuclear power was supposed to lead to a limitless consumer culture, a world of flying cars and autonomous kitchens all powered by clean energy. In Europe, it offered the then-limping continent a cheap, inexhaustible supply of power after years of rationing and infrastructure damage brought on by two World Wars.
The development of nuclear-powered submarines and ships during the 1940s and 50s led car designers to begin conceptualizing atomic vehicles. Fueled by a consistent reaction, these cars would theoretically produce no harmful byproducts and rarely need to refuel. Combining these vehicles with the new interstate system presented amazing potential for American mobility.
But the fantasy soon faded. There were just too many problems with the realities of nuclear power. For starters, the powerplant would be too small to attain a reaction unless the car contained weapons-grade atomic materials. Doing so would mean every fender-bender could result in a minor nuclear holocaust. Additionally, many of the designers assumed a lightweight shielding material or even forcefields would eventually be invented (they still haven't) to protect passengers from harmful radiation. Analyses of the atomic car concept at the time determined that a 50-ton lead barrier would be necessary to prevent exposure.