Find or Sell Used Cars, Trucks, and SUVs in USA

1964 Fastback 390 Thunderbird Special Project Coupe Ac Bench 6.4l 300hp on 2040-cars

Year:1964 Mileage:29220 Color: Black /
 Black
Location:

Dallas, Texas, United States

Dallas, Texas, United States
Body Type:Coupe
Vehicle Title:Clear
Fuel Type:Gasoline
For Sale By:Private Seller
Engine:390
Transmission:Automatic
VIN: 4d66z154885 Year: 1964
Make: Ford
Model: Galaxie
Trim: FASTBACK
Disability Equipped: No
Drive Type: RWD
Warranty: Vehicle does NOT have an existing warranty
Exterior Color: Black
Mileage: 29,220
Interior Color: Black
Sub Model: FAstback
Number of Cylinders: 8
Power Options: Air Conditioning
Condition: UsedA vehicle is considered used if it has been registered and issued a title. Used vehicles have had at least one previous owner. The condition of the exterior, interior and engine can vary depending on the vehicle's history. See the seller's listing for full details and description of any imperfections.Seller Notes:"Its a project 1 owner car. Originally owner took the front end off 20 years ago. To fix a curb hit. I bought it and put it in the warehouse but never started it. SO its a semi unmolested as there are a lot of FoMoCO front end piece in boxes for it."

Auto Services in Texas

Lone Star Engine Center ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service, Auto Engine Rebuilding, Automobile Electric Service
Address: 405 Ann Ave, Hutchins
Phone: (214) 821-0692

Armadillo Auto Glass ★★★★★

Automobile Parts & Supplies, Windshield Repair, Automobile Accessories
Address: 3510 Guadalupe St., Bee-Cave
Phone: (512) 836-7712

Kelso Automotive ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service, Brake Repair
Address: 5202 Bingle Rd, Cypress
Phone: (713) 682-8211

Sharp State Inspection ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service, Emissions Inspection Stations, Inspection Service
Address: 831 9th Ave N, Arcadia
Phone: (409) 941-0519

Progressive Auto Repair ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service
Address: 5131 Glenmont Dr, Winchester
Phone: (713) 668-3639

Homann Tire & Automotive ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service, Tire Dealers, Wheels-Aligning & Balancing
Address: 8415 McCullough Ave, Hill-Country-Village
Phone: (210) 344-9291

Auto blog

2014 Ford F-150 gets CNG option

Wed, 31 Jul 2013 00:01:00 EST

Ford is toiling away, installing heavy-duty engine components into select 3.7-liter V6s to allow them to run on compressed natural gas (CNG) and liquid petroleum gas (LPG) in addition to gasoline. That's nothing new, but now, Ford has announced that it will offer the 2014 F-150 with this engine configuration, bringing the Blue Oval's total number of CNG/LPG-friendly vehicles up to eight. The F-150 will be the only half-ton pickup on the market that can run on these gases.
Ford will charge $315 per vehicle to equip the optional engine, but the trucks won't be ready to run on the alternative fuels straight from the factory and must be upfitted with additional equipment. A Ford Qualified Vehicle Modifier will install a separate fuel system for the compressed gases at a cost of $7,500 to $9,500, depending on fuel tank size. With the right-size tank, the F-150 equipped with the CNG/LPG-prepped engine can go 750 miles on one tank of gas, according to Ford, averaging 23 miles per gallon.
The practice of offering flex-fuel vehicles is gaining momentum as businesses take advantage of cheap gas. CNG can be bought for $2.11/gallon on average (per gasoline equivalent), and sometimes for as little as $1.00 in some parts of the US, Ford states. "With the money saved using CNG, customers could start to see payback on their investment in as little as 24 to 36 months," says Jon Coleman, Ford's fleet sustainability and technology manager. The automaker expects to sell a total of 15,000 CNG/LPG-prepped vehicles in the 2014 model year.

Ford trademarking 'Mach 1,' possibly for Mustang

Thu, 24 Oct 2013 15:45:00 EST

A legendary name might be accompanying the redesigned, 2015 Mustang when it finally makes its world debut - Mach 1. Stumbled upon by the team at Ford Authority, the Mach 1 title was found in a trademark filing with the US Patent and Trademark Office, and would revive a name last used on the fourth-generation, 2003 Mustang.
While the the 2003 vintage was well and good, the Mach 1 is really remembered for a three-year run from 1969 to 1971 - it's best to just forget the emissions-choked 1972 to 1978 Mach 1s - when power output ranged from a modest 250 horsepower with the two-barrel, 351-cubic-inch Windsor V8 to "375 hp" (actual output was rumored to be well north of 400 horsepower) with the righteous, 429-cubic-inch Super Cobra Jet V8.
What does the title hold for the sixth-generation Mustang? It's tough to say. The fanatics at Ford Authority seem to think Mach 1 could take the place of the Shelby GT500 at the top of the Mustang hierarchy, which sounds like a valid argument. At the same time, we could see the SVT Cobra moniker returning for the flagship model, and the Mach 1 doing battle with the Chevrolet Camaro Z/28 (unless the Boss 302 were to return). Confounding things is the historical precedent - the Mach 1 was responsible for the death of the Mustang GT in 1969, so it might make sense as a volume performance model.

Nuclear-powered concept cars from the Atomic Age

Thu, 17 Jul 2014 12:31:00 EST

In the 1950s and early 60s, the dawn of nuclear power was supposed to lead to a limitless consumer culture, a world of flying cars and autonomous kitchens all powered by clean energy. In Europe, it offered the then-limping continent a cheap, inexhaustible supply of power after years of rationing and infrastructure damage brought on by two World Wars.
The development of nuclear-powered submarines and ships during the 1940s and 50s led car designers to begin conceptualizing atomic vehicles. Fueled by a consistent reaction, these cars would theoretically produce no harmful byproducts and rarely need to refuel. Combining these vehicles with the new interstate system presented amazing potential for American mobility.
But the fantasy soon faded. There were just too many problems with the realities of nuclear power. For starters, the powerplant would be too small to attain a reaction unless the car contained weapons-grade atomic materials. Doing so would mean every fender-bender could result in a minor nuclear holocaust. Additionally, many of the designers assumed a lightweight shielding material or even forcefields would eventually be invented (they still haven't) to protect passengers from harmful radiation. Analyses of the atomic car concept at the time determined that a 50-ton lead barrier would be necessary to prevent exposure.