Find or Sell Used Cars, Trucks, and SUVs in USA

63 Ford Falcon Futura on 2040-cars

Year:1963 Mileage:99999 Color: Red
Location:

Williamsville, Virginia, United States

Williamsville, Virginia, United States
Transmission:auto
Engine:260
Vehicle Title:Clear
Fuel Type:Gasoline
For Sale By:Private Seller
Year: 1963
Exterior Color: Red
Model: Falcon
Number of Cylinders: 8
Trim: futura
Drive Type: rear
Mileage: 99,999
Sub Model: futura
Make: Ford
Condition: Used: A vehicle is considered used if it has been registered and issued a title. Used vehicles have had at least one previous owner. The condition of the exterior, interior and engine can vary depending on the vehicle's history. See the seller's listing for full details and description of any imperfections. ... 

ita 63 ford falcon its pretty wrogh but if some1 can use it i have a lot of parts 260 with the trans .4 fendres .2 hoods and part of another acr with the floor pans and trunk it all goes  any questions just call or text 5408399177 the engine is not in the car i dout it runs but it there

Auto Services in Virginia

A & L Radiator & Auto Repair ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service, Automobile Parts & Supplies, Radiators Automotive Sales & Service
Address: 7702 Backlick Rd Ste C, Arlington
Phone: (703) 455-0070

Sun Tech Auto Glass ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service, Glass-Auto, Plate, Window, Etc, Windshield Repair
Address: 934 N Augusta St, Churchville
Phone: (888) 543-0433

O`Reilly Auto Parts ★★★★★

Automobile Parts & Supplies
Address: 178 Kane St, Gate-City
Phone: (276) 386-7311

Greenbush Automotive Inc ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service
Address: 15329 Bull St, Nelsonia
Phone: (757) 665-5809

New Beginnings Auto Body Inc. ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service, Automobile Body Repairing & Painting, Commercial Auto Body Repair
Address: 15482 Warwick Blvd., Suite C, Grafton
Phone: (757) 888-2394

Van`s Garage ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service
Address: 77 Wayside Dr, Weyers-Cave
Phone: (540) 234-8294

Auto blog

Saleen previews new 302 Mustang

Thu, 03 Jul 2014 10:01:00 EST

The introduction of a new generation of a model like the Ford Mustang may be exciting enough in its own right for enthusiasts, but that's just the tip of the proverbial iceberg, because you know that Ford itself as well as numerous aftermarket tuners will soon follow up with even more desirable versions. And few Mustang tuners carry quite the same clout of Saleen.
Recently reunited after its previous split, Saleen is back on the map and hard at work on new aftermarket modifications for a wide array of muscle cars. We knew it would only be a matter of time before it would release a new 302 Mustang, and now it's sent out the first image to show us what to expect.
Details are scarce, but House that Steve Built says the 2015 Saleen 302 Mustang "is perfectly positioned as the next American exotic." And it should know, considering that it's the same outfit that produced the Saleen S7 that really was a true American exotic. From the teaser image above we can see that Saleen has given its Mustang a new front air dam, a very wide air scoop on the hood and of course Saleen's trademark slat grille.

Car companies used to cook up sales with recipe books

Fri, 08 Aug 2014 08:45:00 EST

The evolution of automotive marketing has undergone a number of strange phases. Few, though, match the strangeness of the 1930s to 1950s, when automotive marketers turned to cookbooks as a means of promoting their vehicles. Yes, cookbooks. We can't make this stuff up, folks.
This bizarre trend led to General Motors distributing cookbooks under the guise of its then-subsidiary Frigidaire. Ford, meanwhile, offered a compilation of recipes from Ford Credit Employees (shown above). The cookbook-craze wasn't limited to domestic manufacturers, though. As The Detroit News discovered, both Rolls-Royce and Volkswagen got in on the trend, although not until the 1970s.
The News has the full story on this strange bit of marketing. Head over and take a look.

2015 Ford Transit

Wed, 11 Jun 2014 11:58:00 EST

As a segment, fullsize vans are stealth-fighter invisible on most consumers' radar. Visit a dealership for any of the four brands that offer them and you'll be lucky to find even one on display. These are commercial vehicles primarily, even more so than pickup trucks. Vans are the shuttles for plumbers, caterers, carpenters, concrete layers, masons, electricians, florists and flooring, and a huge part of this country's productivity is accomplished using them. At the moment, Ford is the 800-pound gorilla in that room - fully 41 percent of commercial vehicles wear a Blue Oval. So when Ford announced three years ago it would be ditching its commercial bread-and-butter E-Series, it meant the Transit that would be replacing the Econoline had huge, 53-year-old shoes to fill.
We were still a bit nostalgic about Econoline vans going away until going directly from the Transit first drive in Kansas City to an E-350 airport shuttle. Climb up through the Econoline's tiny double doors and bang your head on the opening, crouch all the way to your seat then enjoy a loud, rattle-prone, creaky, harsh ride on beam-hard seats while struggling to see out the low windows. This is an experience nearly every traveler has had. By comparison, the Transits we'd just spent two days with were every bit of the four decades better they needed to be. It cannot be understated just how much better the Transit is in every single way. The load floor is barely more than knee high. There's a huge side door, and hitting your head on a door opening is nearly impossible. Stand up all the way if you're under six-foot, six-inches - no more half-hunching down the aisle. There are windows actually designed to be looked out of. The ride is buttery smooth, no booming vibration from un-restrained metal panels and no squeaks. Conversations can be held at normal levels rather than yelling over the roar of an ancient V8. The seats are comfortable. The AC is cold. There are cupholders.
Enough anecdote-laying, what's in a Transit? We're talking about a very fullsized unibody van that's enjoyed a 49-year history in Ye Olde Europe. This latest iteration is part of the "One Ford" initiative, so it was designed as a global offering from the get-go, eschewing the body-on-frame construction the E-Series has used since 1975. Instead, the Transit integrates a rigid ladder frame into an overall frame construction made of high-strength cold-rolled and boron steel. The suspension is a simple but well-tuned Macpherson strut array up front with a rear solid axle and leaf springs.