Find or Sell Used Cars, Trucks, and SUVs in USA

1965 Ford F Series F350 Truck With Flat Bed - No Reserve! on 2040-cars

Year:1965 Mileage:100000
Location:

Almont, North Dakota, United States

Almont, North Dakota, United States

One Ton F350 with 12' bed
 V-8
Ran when parked several years ago - will need work to be road worthy again, but shouldn't be too bad!
Tires hold air.
Actual mileage unknown.

Auto Services in North Dakota

Veracity Motors ★★★★★

New Car Dealers
Address: 1701 E Main Ave, Mandan
Phone: (701) 258-2277

O`Reilly Auto Parts ★★★★★

Automobile Parts & Supplies
Address: 4457 Main Ave, Casselton
Phone: (701) 281-5084

Hollen Auto Body ★★★★★

Automobile Body Repairing & Painting, Automobile Parts & Supplies, Glass-Auto, Plate, Window, Etc
Address: 124 42nd St W, Springbrook
Phone: (701) 577-8499

Certified Auto Repair ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service, Brake Repair, Auto Oil & Lube
Address: 3060 25th St S # B, Fargo
Phone: (701) 239-2575

Buy-Rite Auto Sales ★★★★★

New Car Dealers, Used Car Dealers, Wholesale Used Car Dealers
Address: 2801 Main Ave, Horace
Phone: (701) 293-9504

Quality Auto Body Shop ★★★★

Auto Repair & Service, New Car Dealers, Automobile Body Repairing & Painting
Address: 404 25th St S, Reiles-Acres
Phone: (866) 304-4310

Auto blog

Ford says 70% of its models to get stop-start by 2017

Sun, 15 Dec 2013 17:59:00 EST

Ford is following up on a report we posted a few weeks back that the Blue Oval would be adding stop-start technology to its entire model range. Now, the Dearborn-based automaker has announced that the fuel-saving feature would be available on 70 percent of the company's range by 2017.
Ford claims the technology will improve fuel economy by around 3.5 percent, although its actual effect will vary based on how the owner drives - apparently up to a 10-percent improvement is possible for those who sit in heavy traffic (Los Angelenos, this means you). The latest recipient of the technology is the updated 2014 Ford Fiesta with the company's three-cylinder EcoBoost powerplant.
Part of the reasoning for the new addition has to do with cost. Ford claims the tech is affordable and easy to implement. "Simply put, Auto Start-Stop helps customers use less fuel, which is an important component of Ford's Blueprint for Sustainability," Ford's global powertrain vice president, Bob Fascetti, said.

2015 Ford Mustang already under recall, but just 53 units

Sun, 19 Oct 2014 12:03:00 EST

Ford has issued a small - but significant - recall for one of its spotlight cars: the 2015 Mustang.
The recall affects just 53 cars, with 50 in the United States and three in Canada. Ford said the passenger side safety belt buckle tension sensor may not have been calibrated properly by the supplier. This could lead to "misclassification" of the passenger seat occupant, and could cause the airbag to deploy improperly.
A Ford spokesperson didn't immediately respond to a request for comment. In a statement, the automaker said it is not aware of any accidents or injuries, and dealers will replace the buckle assembly at no cost to customers. The cars affected were built at Flat Rock Assembly Plant in Michigan from Aug. 18 to Oct. 2.

Ford-sponsored survey says a third of Brits have snapped a 'selfie' while driving [w/videos]

Fri, 08 Aug 2014 09:30:00 EST

Talking on the phone while driving isn't advisable, and texting while driving is downright dangerous. Considering those truths, the fact that we even need to point this out this is incredibly disturbing: taking "selfies" while behind the wheel is exceptionally stupid. But, it's a thing that a third of 18- to 24-year-old British drivers have copped to doing, according to a new study from Ford.
Ford, through its Driving Skills for Life program, surveyed 7,000 smartphone owners from across Europe, all aged between 18 and 24, and found that young British drivers were more likely to snap a selfie while behind the wheel than their counterparts in Germany, France, Romania, Italy, Spain and Belgium.
According to the study, the average selfie takes 14 seconds, which, while traveling at 60 miles per hour, is long enough to travel over the length of nearly four football fields (the Ford study uses soccer fields, but we translated it to football, because, you know, America). That's an extremely dangerous distance to not be focused on the road.