Find or Sell Used Cars, Trucks, and SUVs in USA

2002 Ford F-250 Super Duty Xl Crew Cab Pickup 4-door 6.8l With A Tommy Gate on 2040-cars

Year:2002 Mileage:184599
Location:

Hollandale, Minnesota, United States

Hollandale, Minnesota, United States

Auto Services in Minnesota

Tire Pros & Wheel Experts ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service, Used Car Dealers, Automobile Parts & Supplies
Address: 1800 Crest View Dr, Oak-Park-Heights
Phone: (715) 808-0195

Southern Minnesota Auto & Motor Sport ★★★★★

New Car Dealers, Automobile Body Repairing & Painting, Used Car Dealers
Address: 20899 610th Ave, Eagle-Lake
Phone: (507) 257-3929

Prior Lake Transmission ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service, Auto Transmission, Auto Oil & Lube
Address: Cokato
Phone: (952) 679-8734

Oscar Auto Body Inc ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service, Automobile Body Repairing & Painting, Truck Body Repair & Painting
Address: 2827 1st Ave S, Saint-Louis-Park
Phone: (612) 871-7052

Northside Auto ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service, Automobile Parts & Supplies, Auto Oil & Lube
Address: 4200 Fremont Ave N, Brooklyn-Park
Phone: (612) 200-0149

Nordic Auto Glass LLC ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service, Windshield Repair, Glass-Auto, Plate, Window, Etc
Address: Freeport
Phone: (763) 260-1415

Auto blog

Ford opens the doors on its Swedish rally skunkworks

Fri, 19 Sep 2014 17:13:00 EST

It's always amazing to see how different kinds of racecars are made. Formula One racers are often constructed in modern architectural marvels that hint at some of the cutting-edge technology going into the racing. Conversely, rallying is all about sliding around on a varied course as fast as possible, but it often leaves a vehicle caked in mud. So it makes some sense Olsbergs MSE, or simply (OMSE) rally car shop in Nynashamn, Sweden, shows technological sophistication in a more down-to-earth setting. It builds Ford Fiesta ST racers for Global Rallycross there, and this new video gives viewers a tour through the work.
Former rally driver Andreas Eriksson runs OMSE. These days instead of racing, he and the company's 46 employees are building Ford racers from scratch. A ton of work goes into constructing each one, and according to Eriksson, it takes 400 hours to complete each body. At times, things are so busy that some of the technicians live in the shop in apartments that are on premises. There's even a restaurant to keep them fed. Sadly the dyno room is empty during this visit, though.
By the time OMSE is done, a rallycross car might resemble a Fiesta ST on the outside, but as you see in the video, it's a completely different beast underneath. Check out the work it takes to build one of them, and scroll down to read more about it in the official release.

2015 Ford F-150 shaves 700 pounds, adds 2.7-liter EcoBoost [w/video]

Mon, 13 Jan 2014 00:01:00 EST

The Ford F-150 is one of the best selling vehicles on the planet. Considering that, one can imagine that when it comes time for a redesign, there are hardly any half measures. For its lucky thirteenth generation, Ford has gone all-in on the single most important vehicle in its portfolio, redesigning it from the ground up.
The big news is the F-150's new, lightweight, Atlas-inspired body. Ninety-three percent of that new body is made from a sort of aluminum alloy not unlike what the US military uses in its M2 Bradley fighting vehicles and Humvees, and it accounts for up to 70 percent of the F-150's 700-pound weight reduction. As a side benefit, the aluminum body should prove more resistant to dents and dings. Built Ford tough, indeed.
If you're wondering where the other 30 percent of that 700-pound weight loss went, 8.5 percent (60 pounds) came from the increased use of high-strength steel (up from 23 percent to 77 percent) in its ladder-box frame. Ford claims this steel is comparable to some of the heavy duty pickups used by its competitors, with a PSI rating of 70,000.

Auto industry insider previews tell-all book, What Did Jesus Drive?

Tue, 11 Nov 2014 10:59:00 EST



"It's about some of the biggest crises in history. It's about who did it right and who did it wrong." - Jason Vines
Jason Vines, the former head of public relations at Chrysler, Ford and Nissan, has seen a lot during his more than 30-year career, and now he's offering a behind-the-scenes look at the auto industry in his tell-all book What Did Jesus Drive? that went on sale this month.