Find or Sell Used Cars, Trucks, and SUVs in USA

1956 F100 Big Back Window , Killer Custom Show Truck , Trade on 2040-cars

Year:1956 Mileage:30000 Color: Orange
Location:

Lowell, Indiana, United States

Lowell, Indiana, United States
Transmission:350
Engine:406 SBC
Vehicle Title:Clear
VIN: F10V6G1413 Year: 1956
Mileage: 30,000
Make: Ford
Exterior Color: Orange
Model: F-100
Number of Cylinders: 8
Trim: CUSTOM
Drive Type: RWD
Options: Leather Seats, CD Player
Condition: Used: A vehicle is considered used if it has been registered and issued a title. Used vehicles have had at least one previous owner. The condition of the exterior, interior and engine can vary depending on the vehicle's history. See the seller's listing for full details and description of any imperfections. ... 

Auto Services in Indiana

Kenny`s Transmission of Greenwood ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service, Automobile Parts & Supplies, Auto Transmission
Address: 340 S Madison Ave, Greenwood
Phone: (317) 887-1371

Merlin Motors ★★★★★

Used Car Dealers
Address: 8037 N State Road 9, Alexandria
Phone: (765) 724-3880

Tilley`s Hilltop ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service, Automobile Parts & Supplies, Auto Transmission
Address: 4427 E Pleasant Ridge Rd, Madison
Phone: (812) 273-4667

Firestone Complete Auto Care ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service, Tire Dealers
Address: 6522 E Washington St, Southport

Concepts In Motion ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service, Automobile Parts & Supplies, Trailer Hitches
Address: 312 E 29th St, Oakville
Phone: (765) 649-7971

Mario`s Radiator & Automotive Service ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service, Radiators Automotive Sales & Service, Brake Repair
Address: 3921 E Washington St, Wanamaker
Phone: (317) 356-9180

Auto blog

Jim Farley to lead Ford of Europe

Fri, 07 Nov 2014 11:31:00 EST



"We are excited to see Jim and Stephen take on these new roles as they bring unique skills, experience and fresh perspectives to these critical positions." - Mark Fields
Ford marketing chief Jim Farley is taking over the company's troubled European operations as part of an executive shuffle confirmed on Friday morning.

Ford S-Max Concept proves minivans aren't always minivans [w/video]

Tue, 10 Sep 2013 19:01:00 EST

Ford's latest don't-call-it-a-minivan is called the S-Max Concept, and it's a looker. As you can see, the conceptual overgrown hatch makes good use of Ford's latest design language, especially at the very front of the S-Max, which bears a striking resemblance to production models that include the Focus, C-Max and Fusion.
Powering the S-Max Concept is a 1.5-liter EcoBoost engine, and while Ford doesn't actually list power figures for the concept, previous estimates put the mill at 133 kW of power (about 178 horsepower) and 240 Nm of torque (about 177 pound-feet). Inside, there's room for seven passengers and at least some of their luggage.
As you'd expect, the S-Max is loaded up with all of Ford's latest infotainment technology, including Sync and MyFordTouch. More interestingly, there are also onboard heart and blood glucose monitors that we doubt will be seeing the light of production anytime soon. On that topic, don't expect to see any S-Max-shaped vehicles hitting the US market from Ford, either. Scroll down below for the press release, but not before checking out the high-res image gallery above.

Nuclear-powered concept cars from the Atomic Age

Thu, 17 Jul 2014 12:31:00 EST

In the 1950s and early 60s, the dawn of nuclear power was supposed to lead to a limitless consumer culture, a world of flying cars and autonomous kitchens all powered by clean energy. In Europe, it offered the then-limping continent a cheap, inexhaustible supply of power after years of rationing and infrastructure damage brought on by two World Wars.
The development of nuclear-powered submarines and ships during the 1940s and 50s led car designers to begin conceptualizing atomic vehicles. Fueled by a consistent reaction, these cars would theoretically produce no harmful byproducts and rarely need to refuel. Combining these vehicles with the new interstate system presented amazing potential for American mobility.
But the fantasy soon faded. There were just too many problems with the realities of nuclear power. For starters, the powerplant would be too small to attain a reaction unless the car contained weapons-grade atomic materials. Doing so would mean every fender-bender could result in a minor nuclear holocaust. Additionally, many of the designers assumed a lightweight shielding material or even forcefields would eventually be invented (they still haven't) to protect passengers from harmful radiation. Analyses of the atomic car concept at the time determined that a 50-ton lead barrier would be necessary to prevent exposure.