Find or Sell Used Cars, Trucks, and SUVs in USA

2006 Ford Explorer Xlt 4x4 Sharp on 2040-cars

US $11,000.00
Year:2006 Mileage:72326
Location:

Thorntown, Indiana, United States

Thorntown, Indiana, United States

 Up for sale is this 2006 Ford Explorer XLT 4x4. 72,326 miles. Advance Trac RSC. Has 3rd row seating. This is an automatic. Has a  6 CD stereo. Leather seats. Rear air. This suv is clean from top to bottom and from front to back! Suv is for sale locally. We have the right to end the auction early. There will be a $500.00 deposit due within 24 hours of end of auction. If you have any questions give Johnny a call at (765)206-5495. Do NOT email or send messages thru ebay. I am listing this for Johnny so call him.

***Car is being sold as is***

Auto Services in Indiana

Zamudio Auto Sales ★★★★★

New Car Dealers, Used Car Dealers, Wholesale Used Car Dealers
Address: 4151 S Kedzie Ave, Whiting
Phone: (773) 847-8786

Westgate Chrysler Jeep Dodge ★★★★★

New Car Dealers, Used Car Dealers
Address: 2695 E Main St, Plainfield
Phone: (317) 839-6554

Tom Roush Lincoln Mazda ★★★★★

New Car Dealers, Used Car Dealers
Address: 525 David Brown Dr, Castleton
Phone: (866) 869-7884

Tim`s Wrecker Service & Garage ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service, Towing, Truck Wrecking
Address: Millhousen
Phone: (812) 663-3159

Superior Towing ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service, Towing
Address: 19948 State Line Rd, Notre-Dame
Phone: (574) 277-7002

Stan`s Auto Electric Inc ★★★★★

Automobile Parts & Supplies, Auto Body Parts
Address: 5115 E 30th St, Wanamaker
Phone: (317) 545-8537

Auto blog

2015 Ford Transit

Wed, 11 Jun 2014 11:58:00 EST

As a segment, fullsize vans are stealth-fighter invisible on most consumers' radar. Visit a dealership for any of the four brands that offer them and you'll be lucky to find even one on display. These are commercial vehicles primarily, even more so than pickup trucks. Vans are the shuttles for plumbers, caterers, carpenters, concrete layers, masons, electricians, florists and flooring, and a huge part of this country's productivity is accomplished using them. At the moment, Ford is the 800-pound gorilla in that room - fully 41 percent of commercial vehicles wear a Blue Oval. So when Ford announced three years ago it would be ditching its commercial bread-and-butter E-Series, it meant the Transit that would be replacing the Econoline had huge, 53-year-old shoes to fill.
We were still a bit nostalgic about Econoline vans going away until going directly from the Transit first drive in Kansas City to an E-350 airport shuttle. Climb up through the Econoline's tiny double doors and bang your head on the opening, crouch all the way to your seat then enjoy a loud, rattle-prone, creaky, harsh ride on beam-hard seats while struggling to see out the low windows. This is an experience nearly every traveler has had. By comparison, the Transits we'd just spent two days with were every bit of the four decades better they needed to be. It cannot be understated just how much better the Transit is in every single way. The load floor is barely more than knee high. There's a huge side door, and hitting your head on a door opening is nearly impossible. Stand up all the way if you're under six-foot, six-inches - no more half-hunching down the aisle. There are windows actually designed to be looked out of. The ride is buttery smooth, no booming vibration from un-restrained metal panels and no squeaks. Conversations can be held at normal levels rather than yelling over the roar of an ancient V8. The seats are comfortable. The AC is cold. There are cupholders.
Enough anecdote-laying, what's in a Transit? We're talking about a very fullsized unibody van that's enjoyed a 49-year history in Ye Olde Europe. This latest iteration is part of the "One Ford" initiative, so it was designed as a global offering from the get-go, eschewing the body-on-frame construction the E-Series has used since 1975. Instead, the Transit integrates a rigid ladder frame into an overall frame construction made of high-strength cold-rolled and boron steel. The suspension is a simple but well-tuned Macpherson strut array up front with a rear solid axle and leaf springs.

Jay Leno is far beyond driven in his 1971 Pantera

Mon, 23 Jun 2014 19:58:00 EST

Perhaps it's fitting that the band Pantera is known for its heavy metal music, because the DeTomaso Pantera is the automotive equivalent of a metal album. It's short, aggressive and makes a mean sound. It doesn't mess around either, with a Ford 351-cubic-inch (5.75-liter) V8 sending mountains of torque to the rear wheels. This week, Jay Leno takes us on a detailed tour of his '71 to show why it rocks.
There's a regular format to Jay Leno's Garage. It starts with Jay and maybe a guest taking a look at the car and talking about its history, and then they take it out on the open road. However, this video is practically a Pantera buyer's guide. Jay is adamant from the start that the last thing anyone should own is a stock example. To remedy this, he and his guest, the editor of the Pantera Club magazine, take viewers to school about some of the ways to turn them into even better performance machines.
No matter what you do to it, though, the Pantera requires that the driver adapt to it, not the other way around. For example, Jay isn't a big guy by most standards, but he has to cram himself into the cockpit with his shoes off and shirt partially unbuttoned just to go for a drive. Still, once out on the road, it all makes sense with that rumbling V8 and those Italian supercar looks. Scroll down to watch and learn a lot more about this uncompromising '70s performance car.

2013 Ford Explorer Sport

Thu, 04 Apr 2013 15:00:00 EST

When one speaks of sporty and fun-to-drive utility vehicles, few would put the Ford Explorer in the same category as the Jeep Grand Cherokee SRT8, BMW X5 or Porsche Cayenne. Yet, with just a few reservations, I'd toss the new-for-2013 Ford Explorer Sport close to that arena for consideration.
As a recap, the sportiest of Explorers is fitted with Ford's twin-turbocharged 3.5-liter Ecoboost V6, making 365 horsepower and 350 pound feet of torque. Acceleration is brisk (figure about 7 seconds to 60 miles per hour), as power goes to all four wheels through a six-speed automatic transmission. Contributing to its more athletic demeanor are larger front brakes, a sport-tuned suspension, chassis upgrades, quicker steering ratio and a more aggressive wheel/tire package. Cosmetically, the Sport is distinguished by its blacked-out lights, black trim and noticeable lack of chrome (with the exception of the door handles).
Ford recently handed me the keys to a Ruby Red Metallic Explorer Sport. Rather than mindlessly drive the big seven-passenger all-wheel drive hauler in soccer mom circles around Los Angeles, I loaded up my family and embarked on a long weekend road trip to Yosemite National Park.