Find or Sell Used Cars, Trucks, and SUVs in USA

1969 Ford Bronco Highly Customized Trail Rig With 5.0 V8 With Efi!!! on 2040-cars

US $7,500.00
Year:1969 Mileage:50000 Color: Bright Green /
 Bright Green
Location:

Durango, Colorado, United States

Durango, Colorado, United States
Engine:5.ol H.O. w/EFI
Transmission:NP 435 transmission 4 speed manual
Vehicle Title:Clear
For Sale By:Private Seller
VIN: U15GLF11646 Year: 1969
Exterior Color: Bright Green
Model: Bronco
Interior Color: Bright Green
Trim: Customized Vehicle
Number of Cylinders: 8
Drive Type: 4WD
Mileage: 50,000
Condition: Used: A vehicle is considered used if it has been registered and issued a title. Used vehicles have had at least one previous owner. The condition of the exterior, interior and engine can vary depending on the vehicle's history. See the seller's listing for full details and description of any imperfections. ... 

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Import Auto Svc ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service, Automobile Body Repairing & Painting, Brake Repair
Address: 407 Riverside Ave, Masonville
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DIY Auto Repair Shops ★★★★★

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Auto blog

GM also sheds parts from its pickups to boost payload ratings

Thu, 31 Jul 2014 16:30:00 EST

The row between Ford and Ram over who boasts the best-in-class tow rating for heavy duty pickups has revealed a number of things. Chief among them is a report that Ford removes items like the spare tire, jack, radio and center console from its vehicles in a bid to lower its base curb weight and therefore keep the truck's gross vehicle weight rating down.
For those that need a refresher, GVWR is the vehicle's curb weight plus its maximum payload. A lower GVWR allows Ford to station its F-450 among the so-called Class III pickups, despite the fact that internally, it has the makings of a more brutish Class IV truck.
Ford explains away these deletions, saying a customer could order their vehicle in such a manner. It has also come to light that Ford is not the only automaker to engage in such practices.

Ken Block hoons his Ford F-150 RaptorTrax on the slopes

Wed, 08 Oct 2014 12:45:00 EST

Ken Block drives Fords. Hoons the heck out of 'em, actually. Mostly Fiestas, but also the occasional Focus or Mustang. But earlier this year, the Gymkhana guru revealed his baddest Ford yet: an F-150 SVT Raptor on tracks. And true to form, here he is putting it to the test in the latest video from Monster Energy and Hoonigan Racing.
Filmed at Baldface Lodge in Nelson, BC, the video pairs Block up with snowboarders Zak Hale and Ethan Deiss for some deep-powder action. You'll want to watch the video for yourself, but the bottom line is that the RaptorTrax beats the heck out of waiting on line for the ski lift. It's enough to make us start to look forward to winter... almost.

National Geographic Channel balances Ford F-150 on four coffee mugs

Wed, 29 Jan 2014 08:58:00 EST

Proving that there is still something to be learned on television these days, National Geographic Channel recently introduced a new series called Duck Quacks Don't Echo. On the first episode of this science/comedy show, host Michael Ian Black proposes the idea that a truck can be supported with a ceramic coffee mug under each wheel - yes, he says that the entire weight of a truck can be balanced on just four coffee mugs.
Looking to find out whether this is fact or myth, the show uses a regular cab Ford F-150, weighing in at 4,800 pounds, and four average coffee mugs. Lowered onto the mugs, the idea is quickly put to the test. Can the cups hold up under 4,800 pounds? If so, what, exactly, would it take to break them? Scroll down below to find out.