Find or Sell Used Cars, Trucks, and SUVs in USA

Chrysler Town & Country Limited on 2040-cars

US $1,000.00
Year:2012 Mileage:23300 Color: Silver
Location:

Tallahassee, Florida, United States

Tallahassee, Florida, United States

2012 Chrysler Town & Country Limited, this car belongs to my uncle and he is the first owner of the vehicle. The minivan is super clean and everything works like new, the car is loaded with all the Limited package items and its as close to buying a new car as it gets.

Auto Services in Florida

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Auto blog

Conan releases extended cut of Chrysler's Super Bowl ad

Tue, 04 Feb 2014 12:44:00 EST

Chrysler's latest Super Bowl ad follows in the footsteps of its classic Imported From Detroit spot starring rapper Eminem and Half-Time in America ad starring Clint Eastwood. Featuring Bob Dylan's gravely voice asking, "Is there anything more American... than America?" the spot has been somewhat controversial, thanks to a few lines informing viewers that Germany can brew beer, Switzerland can make watches and Asia can assemble phones. The US, though, will build your car, Dylan tells us. When the ad aired, Shinola-wearing Detroiters simultaneously spit out their Atwater beer over the perceived slight.
Naturally, that controversy has spawned more than a few parodies, one of which comes from Conan O'Brien. Coco expands on the list of things that aren't made in the US, like French water, Danish cheese and Japanese animated, um, adult films. Beyond those examples, there are a number of other things that should be left to countries that aren't the United States. It's a chuckle-worthy parody, so scroll down and have a look, and compare it to the original Super Bowl ad below that.

Is it time for American carmakers to give up on dual-clutch transmissions? [w/poll]

Mon, 22 Jul 2013 19:31:00 EST

Last week, in the midst of Detroit's first days seeking relief in Chapter 9 of the bankruptcy code, Automotive News contributor Larry P. Vellequette penned an editorial suggesting that American car companies raise the white flag on dual clutch transmissions and give up on trying to persuade Americans to buy cars fitted with them. Why? Because, Vellequette says, like CVT transmissions, they "just don't sound right or feel right to American drivers." (Note: In the article, it's not clear if Vellequette is arguing against wet-clutch and dry-clutch DCTs or just dry-clutch DCTs, which is what Ford and Chrysler use.) The article goes on to state that Ford and Chrysler have experimented with DCTs and that both consumers and the automotive press haven't exactly given them glowing reviews, despite their quicker shifts and increased fuel efficiency potential compared to torque-converter automatic transmissions.
Autoblog staffers who weighed in on the relevance of DCTs in American cars generally disagreed with the blanket nature of Vellequette's statement that they don't sound or feel right, but admit that their lack of refinement compared to traditional automatics can be an issue for consumers. That's particularly true in workaday cars like the Ford Focus and Dodge Dart, both of which have come in for criticism in reviews and owner surveys. From where we sit, the higher-performance orientation of such transmissions doesn't always meld as well with the marching orders of everyday commuters (particularly if drivers haven't been educated as to the transmission's benefits and tradeoffs), and in models not fitted with paddle shifters, it's particularly hard for drivers to use a DCT to its best advantage.
Finally, we also note that DCT tuning is very much an evolving science. For instance, Autoblog editors who objected to dual-clutch tuning in the Dart have more recently found the technology agreeable in the Fiat 500L. Practice makes perfect - or at least more acceptable.

Mopar celebrates 50 years of the 426 Hemi

Thu, 09 Jan 2014 00:01:00 EST

Think of Chrysler performance and the names Mopar and Hemi are bound to come to mind. Chrysler and its Mopar performance parts division first introduced the original Hemi (so named for its hemispherical combustion chambers) back in 1951, celebrating its 60th anniversary in 2011. But it was thirteen years later - 50 years ago - that the Pentastar automaker rolled out the most iconic Hemi of them all: the Gen II 426.
The massive 7.0-liter V8 engine instantly became a muscle car icon and went on to become a favorite of racecar constructors. Two competition versions of the Gen II 426 Hemi were made: one for the track and one for the drag strip, and both went on to illustrious strings of victories. The race engine first debuted at the 1964 Daytona 500 where it powered Richard Petty's Plymouth to the checkered flag and on to the NASCAR championship.
Meanwhile on the drag strip, the Gen II 426 Race Hemi propelled Don Garlits past 200 miles per hour and down the quarter-mile in 7.78 seconds. Changes in NASCAR regulations meant that Chrysler devoted the engine to NHRA drag racing, and to this day the Gen II 426 Race Hemi is still used in Funny Car and Top Fuel dragsters.