Find or Sell Used Cars, Trucks, and SUVs in USA

1972 Cheyenne Super on 2040-cars

US $18,500.00
Year:1972 Mileage:0
Location:

Deer Park, Texas, United States

Deer Park, Texas, United States

Blueprint 383 from Jegs complete to the distributor with GM serpentine kit w/ac with 0 miles
Beefed up 700r4 0 miles
Cragar Super Sports 18x10 w/ Nito tires 255/50/18 0 miles
67-72 Suburban gas tank
Brand new gauge panel with 0 miles
Borla mufflers
All trim parts are there. Front end has been completely rebuilt and lowered 2-4 with a DJM lowering kit 
Truck is in great shape, interior is like new and very little rust
Needs drive shaft, radiator, exhaust and needs to be wired up(harness is there)
With a little work this will easily be a $25k-$30k ride 

Auto Services in Texas

Zepco ★★★★★

Automobile Parts & Supplies, Speedometers, Truck Equipment, Parts & Accessories-Wholesale & Manufacturers
Address: Kemp
Phone: (972) 690-1052

Xtreme Motor Cars ★★★★★

Used Car Dealers
Address: 1025 1/2 North Loop, West-University-Place
Phone: (713) 863-1165

Worthingtons Divine Auto ★★★★★

New Car Dealers
Address: 2412 E Trinity Mills Rd, Bartonville
Phone: (972) 820-0980

Worthington Divine Auto ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service
Address: 1325 Whitlock Ln, Lake-Dallas
Phone: (972) 335-9823

Wills Point Automotive ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service, Wheels-Aligning & Balancing, Wheel Alignment-Frame & Axle Servicing-Automotive
Address: 712 Houston St, Canton
Phone: (903) 873-5900

Weaver Bros. Motor Co ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service, New Car Dealers, New Truck Dealers
Address: 2035 S Wheeler St, Newton
Phone: (409) 384-6847

Auto blog

Vert-A-Pac train cars kept your Chevy Vega's price in check

Fri, 01 Mar 2013 08:46:00 EST

Our apologies to those who've seen this before, but for the rest of the class, how awesome are these pictures of the Vert-A-Pac shipping system General Motors came up with to ship the Chevrolet Vega back in the 1970s? Developed along with Southern Pacific Railroad, GM was able to double the amount of Vega models it could ship by packing them into the unique storage cars vertically.
At the time, rail cars could fit 15 vehicles each, but Chevrolet was able to lower shipping costs by making it possible to ship 30 Vegas per rail car, in turn allowing the price of the Vega to remain as low as possible. Each rail car had 30 doors that would fold down so that a Vega could be strapped on, and then a forklift would come along and lift the door into place. All the cars were positioned nose down, and since they were shipped with all of their required fluids, certain aspects had to be designed specifically for this type of shipping, including an oil baffle in the engine, a special battery and even a repositioned windshield washer reservoir. See for yourself in our image gallery above.

More Corvette Stingray Factoids: Vanishing panel gaps and 26-mpg LT1

Thu, 28 Feb 2013 17:00:00 EST

During January's Detroit Auto Show, we managed a longer than expected wandering tag-team interview with C7 Corvette chief engineering exec Tadge Juechter (pictured above), and LT1 engine boss Jordan Lee (pictured below). They are, quite honestly, two of the very nicest bigshot lads to ever walk the engineering corridors of an American manufacturer. Both are enthralled by what they're doing for a day job. So are we.
We've followed the pre-sale anticipation for the Chevrolet C7 Corvette Stingray like an Oreck vacuum yanking every speck of dirt from a well-trampled carpet. Everything is reportable and contains a grain of further knowledge about this dramatically important and cheered-for car, as it continues to be pressured into representing all that is superior about the American dream. The Corvette wears one heavy cloak.
So, most of what was talked about has been expertly reported already right here on Autoblog. But, looking through our notes again, both Jeuchter and Lee added facts to the buzzing mix.

Use this PowerPoint when convincing your spouse to let you buy a Corvette

Thu, 14 Feb 2013 12:45:00 EST

When you are not the one in charge of the purse strings, creativity is a must when trying to get the string-holder to bankroll that next shiny object you just can't live without.
When I was a kid, I decided that life wasn't worth living if it weren't in pursuit of owning a GMC Typhoon. My 12-year-old self crafted a fiscal strategy that, when combined with my offer of a 49-percent share of ownership in the car in return for my parents' contribution of 80-percent of the purchase price, would see me behind the wheel of a Typhoon by the time I hit college. They walked away from the negotiating table and, the economic climate of the 8th grade being what it was at the time, another partner wasn't found before the Typhoon was discontinued.
Roy El-Rayes, however, has succeeded where 12-year-old me failed, and he did it by using the sort of professionalism that only a PowerPoint presentation can provide, along with some humor and bold-faced flattery.