Find or Sell Used Cars, Trucks, and SUVs in USA

Buick Lacrosse Cxl Sedan 4-door on 2040-cars

US $2,000.00
Year:2005 Mileage:38987 Color: Silver
Location:

Chicago, Illinois, United States

Chicago, Illinois, United States
Buick Lacrosse CXL Sedan 4-Door, US $2,000.00, image 1

This is a rare find! This 2005 Buick LaCrosse has less than 40,000 miles! Everything is mechanically sound, no engine light, brakes great, shifts smooth, starts right up, a/c is cold and runs like a champ. It has beige leather interior and power seats, locks, windows along with heated seats and wood trim. The exterior is also beige with chrome trim. This car sits garaged and is rarely used hence the low miles. The only cons to this great vehicle is the mild amount of body damage. There are various scratches, dents and paint chips that are to be expected for a ten year old car. The biggest dent I have tried to picture is on the back right quarter panel. The leather has some signs of wear and some fading but again it's a ten year old car.

Auto Services in Illinois

Beverly Hills Garage ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service, Automobile Parts & Supplies, Auto Oil & Lube
Address: 2043 W 95th St, Westchester
Phone: (773) 238-0540

Roger Whitmore`s Ud Truck Sales ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service
Address: 3525 Il Route 173, Wadsworth
Phone: (847) 872-6532

Supreme Automotive & Trans ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service, Automobile Repairing & Service-Equipment & Supplies
Address: 1341 S Spencer St, Aurora
Phone: (630) 231-4444

Towing Solutions ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service, Automobile Body Repairing & Painting, Towing
Address: Industry
Phone: (217) 222-5960

Meineke Car Care Center ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service, Brake Repair, Mufflers & Exhaust Systems
Address: 16 W Roosevelt Rd, Addison
Phone: (630) 230-1988

Bell Transmissions ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service, Automobile Parts & Supplies, Auto Transmission
Address: 4399 Fox Valley Center Dr, Bristol
Phone: (630) 851-4700

Auto blog

Lutz dishes dirt on GM in latest Autoline Detroit

Mon, 20 Jun 2011 19:57:00 EST

Bob Lutz sits down for Autoline Detroit - Click above to watch video after the jump
Autoline Detroit recently played host to Bob Lutz, and, as is always the case, the former General Motors vice chairman dished out some great commentary. Lutz was promoting his new book Car Guys vs. Bean Counters: The Battle for the Soul of American Business, and talk quickly turned to his role as it related to product development and high-level decision making at GM. While on the topic of brand management, Lutz revealed a few rather interesting tidbits about his former employer:
All Chevrolet vehicles were required to have five-spoke aluminum wheels and a chrome band up front, as part of the Bowtie brand's overall image.

The importance of Angel Eyes, Ventiports and four round taillights

Sun, 01 Sep 2013 13:00:00 EST

Just the other day, we told you about how Lincoln isn't really a luxury brand, according to Ford's head design man, J Mays. His argument was that Lincoln lacked the unique DNA to differentiate it from the rest of the market, although the arrival of the MKZ is beginning to change that. Now, we have this video from Autoline Detroit, where Jim Hall, an analyst for 2953 Analytics who was quoted in yesterday's Lincoln story, explains the influence of certain styling cues and how they impact the brands.
Using BMW (Angel Eyes) and Buick (Ventiports) as examples for small, simple touches that serve to distinguish the brand's vehicles on the road, Hall then points out how changing trademark styling features, as Chevrolet has done on the new Corvette Stingray, can hurt the vehicle's public perception. Take a look at the full video below for an interesting dive into what these styling features mean to their individual brands.

2014 Buick LaCrosse

Wed, 24 Jul 2013 11:57:00 EST

A Nice, New Buick Aims For Middle Of The Road
Any time someone describes some portion of a car or a driving experience as being "nice," I want to either A) throttle them or B) run as fast and as far as I can from that vehicle. "Nice" is among the most insidious words in the English language - at best it's vague, and at worst, it conveys the exact opposite of its literal meaning. Yet it seems to be used with damnable frequency when it comes to verbally illustrating vehicles. "It looks really nice," or "These seats feel nice," or, heaven forefend, "It's got a nice ride," are all windy signifiers of absolutely nothing resembling a concrete opinion. "Nice" is the adjectival equivalent of meekly smiling and nodding your head.
Of course, I'm as guilty as the next person of having thrown English's least powerful descriptor around. There's even a chance that, rant aside, you'll catch me making nice in reviews to come. That's fine, but you should know that when you stumble upon such usage, past or future, that you've found a sentence in which I'm simply applying a bare minimum of effort to the task.